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View Poll Results: After reading the entire article do you believe the early nanny dog claims?
Undecided 0 0%
Yes I still believe it 4 40.00%
No I think it's a fairly new myth. 3 30.00%
It's a bunch of bull. 3 30.00%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 10. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 06-14-2012, 11:09 AM   #11
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What exactly are you trying to imply? The word PERPETRATED insinuates wrong doing or a crime. "Pit advocates"?

Oops, I meant to use the word perpetuated. I stand corrected!

What difference does any of this make anyway? Actually It probably doesn't make one bit of difference to anyone but myself and my curiosity. Out of that curiosity I posted a question that had come to me based on something I'd read. I was under the impression that a dog forum is the best place to ask questions about dogs since I wouldn't expect to get many answers to the same question in a cooking forum.

How can you say this thread is not about APBTs?
If you're going to quote me, please quote me correctly.

"This isn't meant to be a discussion about pit bulls in general. That subject has been done to death a hundred times over!"

"No this site isn't anti bully and this thread isn't about pits in general."

I would consider anyone that is deeply involved with a breed to consider themselves an advocate for that breed. Don't you consider yourself to be an advocate for Rottweilers? I most certainly consider myself to be an advocate for German Shorthaired Pointers after being deeply involved with the breed for over 30 years.
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Old 06-14-2012, 11:56 AM   #12
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Due to the fact how closely related the breeds are, so close its confusing for most. I say the term nanny dog is relevant and probably was used but might not even been documented. Some people might be talking I am looking for a dog back in the 1920ties, and one says go with a pitbull they are great with kids known for being nanny dogs etc. How does that become documented? esp when bringing to a new country and different cultures. I think the name was always there going across all three breeds of above tbh.
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Old 06-14-2012, 01:45 PM   #13
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I was under the impression that young children were supposed to be supervised with any dog, no matter the breed. Also that even the most friendly larger dog can knock over a small child without meaning any harm at all, a good friend who had a pack of Golden Retrievers used to tell me that all the time.

I think that sort of myth sets parents and dogs up to fail.

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Old 06-14-2012, 02:22 PM   #14
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I was under the impression that young children were supposed to be supervised with any dog, no matter the breed. Also that even the most friendly larger dog can knock over a small child without meaning any harm at all, a good friend who had a pack of Golden Retrievers used to tell me that all the time.

I think that sort of myth sets parents and dogs up to fail.
Excellent point!

Your post brings another question to mind. When did the concept that children are to be supervised when in the presence of any dog begin to become a popular belief?
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Old 06-14-2012, 02:42 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Speckle-legged Dog View Post
I was under the impression that young children were supposed to be supervised with any dog, no matter the breed. Also that even the most friendly larger dog can knock over a small child without meaning any harm at all, a good friend who had a pack of Golden Retrievers used to tell me that all the time.

I think that sort of myth sets parents and dogs up to fail.
I agree. Children are both helpless (to some extent) and irresponsible, for the sake of children and dogs both they should be supervised.

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Excellent point!

Your post brings another question to mind. When did the concept that children are to be supervised when in the presence of any dog begin to become a popular belief?
I don't follow, are you asking when people stopped considering dogs as safe babysitters? I'm not sure we ever had that idea here...

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Old 06-14-2012, 02:53 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Monstermom View Post
I agree. Children are both helpless (to some extent) and irresponsible, for the sake of children and dogs both they should be supervised.



I don't follow, are you asking when people stopped considering dogs as safe babysitters? I'm not sure we ever had that idea here...
i think she means "back in the day" it was ok to leave your kids with a dog... I'm not sure when the change in culture was but back in the day we used to do a lot of stupid things.....like play lawn darts lol

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Old 06-14-2012, 03:43 PM   #17
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I agree. Children are both helpless (to some extent) and irresponsible, for the sake of children and dogs both they should be supervised.



I don't follow, are you asking when people stopped considering dogs as safe babysitters? I'm not sure we ever had that idea here...
Not at all since I don't believe that anyone with plain old common sense ever entrusted the safe care of their child completely to a dog as a babysitter or nanny. I'm questioning when things reached the point that it is commonly recommended that no young child should never ever be left unsupervised in the presence of a dog or dogs!

As I mentioned in another thread; when I was a kid in the late 30's through the 40's, the kids and family dogs were allowed to go outside to play after breakfast. I should clarify that statement to include that not all the neighborhood dogs were deemed safe with kids and dogs, so those dogs naturally were kept at home.

In a neighborhood full of kids and stay-at-home moms there were always several pairs of somewhat distant eyes on them; yet the kids and dogs were allowed to play and interact to their hearts content without anyone hovering over them. Sure there were a few nips and scratches from time to time from rough games of tug-of-war, hide and seek etc. but there were no incidents of actual dog attacks or deliberate bites with any of the kids. My own kids were raised in pretty much the same way until stay at home moms became a rarity.

It's my guess that the end of that era was the beginning of the "never leave a dog alone with a child era". From that point on dogs were much more restricted in their socialization and didn't have the opportunities to interact with children in such large numbers. As a result IMO in today's world we see far more fearful and unsocialized dogs than we did in those days. And as we all know fear often leads to aggression. Along with that, with the increased advantage of instant communication and education we're much better informed about the possibiliity of dog bite than we were 50 or 60 years ago.
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Old 06-14-2012, 03:53 PM   #18
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Carol, those are interesting points...were there leash laws in effect (or even leash mores) when you and/or your children were growing up? Growing up in sterile suburbia, we had dogs around us all the time but if they were out in any area in front of the house or near the sidewalks/streets, the dogs were on leash. Kids running around and playing with dogs were common but this activity was restricted to the backyards of the home which meant that only children that were friends/known to the family-and usually to the dog-, etc. were invited in and involved with interactions with the dog(s).
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Old 06-14-2012, 04:23 PM   #19
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Carol, those are interesting points...were there leash laws in effect (or even leash mores) when you and/or your children were growing up? Growing up in sterile suburbia, we had dogs around us all the time but if they were out in any area in front of the house or near the sidewalks/streets, the dogs were on leash. Kids running around and playing with dogs were common but this activity was restricted to the backyards of the home which meant that only children that were friends/known to the family-and usually to the dog-, etc. were invited in and involved with interactions with the dog(s).
There were no leash laws in those days, most dog owners didn't even own a leash. If the dog needed to be in direct control of the owner, such as in the case of a rare and unusual trip to the vet, a piece of clothesline was usually the leash and collar of choice.

In the 60's the leash laws went into effect in our area but they weren't enforced unless there was a serious problem such as a dog bite or an injured dog. Even now that's pretty much still the way it works.

As far as stray dogs are concerned Animal control will only pick them up if you have the dog contained before you call. I have a clear view from my front window for 4 blocks and on any given day there are anywhere from 3 to 10 dogs roaming back and forth, Mine and my neighbors yard is a huge draw as the feral cats feed at her house and they use my trees and roof as a safe haven.
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Old 06-14-2012, 05:41 PM   #20
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Apples I grew up the same as you but in the 60s and 70s in a rural area. Our dog was never on a leash or a chain.
I can remember many times at a very young age being alone with the dog, Old Boot was my consant companion. That dog followed me every where but school.

Boot was never on a chain, He was also a dog that would bite you if you came into his yard and until you called him you had better stay in your car. But after we knew some one was there he was ok with them. And this same dog was free to roam and be alone with me and other small children.

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