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Old 04-14-2006, 05:33 PM   #1
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Default Getting my first dog... Petland?

My friend has purchased three puppies from Petland. Has anyone had experiences with Petland and what do U thinK? I plan on getting a Boston Terrier.

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Old 04-14-2006, 05:49 PM   #2
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I've heard that puppies from stores (such as Petland and others) tend to have kennel cough and may not be as healthy. Just what I've heard.

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Old 04-14-2006, 06:02 PM   #3
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Most pet store pups come from puppy mills. I suggest you contact the Boston Terrier Club (http://www.bostonterrierclubofamerica.org/) and look for a reputable breeder from which to purchase a puppy.

From the Boston Terrier Club of America:

How To Find A Reputable Breeder
If you are looking for a puppy to buy, PLEASE, buy from a reputable breeder not a "back yard breeder, a "Kitchen" breeder, pet store or a puppy mill. These people have no idea what goes into producing a fine, healthy, sound temperamented specimen typical of the breed. They have no more intention of standing behind this puppy than does the pet store beyond the usual 48 hour health guarantee. Neither the pet store nor the backyard breeder is capable or willing to be there at 2 am when you're concerned that perhaps there's something wrong with the puppy. Although you might pay less for the breed of your choice from a pet store or backyard breeder, it's almost a given that in the long run, you'll pay a good deal more in vet bills and perhaps emotional bills (if the dog has to be euthanized due to a health or temperament problem), than you would from a reputable breeder.

A reputable breeder is a person who is breeding to "improve and preserve" the breed.

A reputable breeder will sell their puppies with a health guarantee and a sales contract.
NOTE: No breeder can guarantee against all hereditary diseases, but a reputable breeder is well informed about their breeds health issues, routinely tests for them, and informs prospective puppy buyers of any problems they have found. Buying from a reputable breeder is your best bet for a healthy pup. They should be able to show you the certificates on their dogs.

Good,reputable breeders do not advertise in the newspaper because they get more than enough referrals from other good breeders and their breed clubs. They produce good health, good temperament, and good conformation, and there is often a waiting list for their pups

A reputable breeder will ask you many questions, may even ask you to fill out an application. He/she will ask about your family, lifestyle, previous dogs you have had, your experience, your yard, and your plans for your pup. He/she might even require references. He/she is not being nosy. They just cares about the pups they has brought into this world, and wants to place them in the best home possible. They want to be sure this is not just an impulse buy that will result in the dog needing a new home in a year. Be leery of a breeder who will sell their pups to just anyone, no questions asked.

A reputable breeder is willing to show you their facilities. You should be able to meet the dam. There will probably even be other dogs: aunts, uncles, cousins, of the litter available. Breeders are usually very proud of their dogs and love to show them off! The sire of the litter may not be available, as often the best match for a particular bitch is a different kennel's dog. But there should be photos, pedigrees, and health test results of the sire for you to see. They should be able to provide references of satisfied puppy buyers. Follow up, ask those people if they are happy with their dog.

Reputable breeders are usually actively involved in the dog fancy. Ask what clubs they are members of. What activities they do with their dogs. They should be regularly showing their dogs in conformation, as that is how good breeders know they are on the right track with their breeding program

The reputable breeder will stand behind his breeding and the puppy. You should be required to sign a contract for any puppy you buy. This contract should include a health guarantee for a certain period of time, and a clause stating the breeder requires that the Boston (or what ever breed) be returned to them if you should ever decide to not keep it (no matter what age or what reason). If the pup is sold as a pet, it should include a spay/neuter clause. It should list the medical treatment the pup has received, including any vaccinations and any parasites it was treated for.

A reputable breeder should strive for the best health, temperament, and conformation. They should have a strong interest in the health and welfare of all Bostons (or their breed) and their future. Their motive with each breeding should be to try to maintain the breed's unique characteristics, produce dogs that very closely adhere to the AKC breed standard, while always considering the health and temperaments of the dogs they produce.

The AKC is just a registering organization. AKC registration papers do not guarantee quality, only that the pup's parents were also registered. It is up to you as a consumer to do your homework when deciding where to get your puppy. Beware of breeders who scoff at health testing, saying their line is problem free. DO NOT buy in haste. Be willing to wait for a pup that has the best chance of living a long healthy life. The purchase price is only a small percentage of the money you will spend on a companion you will have for years. Increase your chances of a healthy pup by following the above guidelines when choosing a breeder.

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Old 04-15-2006, 10:44 PM   #4
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Thumbs down Know of someone who got a pup from a pet store...

My neighbor got a puppy from a pet store, and he turned out just great. No extra vet bills or anything. He was, however, handshy when it came to touching his feet, wich is not very desireable, when you're trying to groom your dog.

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Old 04-15-2006, 10:46 PM   #5
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I've heard lots of negative things about Petland through the internet. I have no experience with Petland but I would'nt recommend getting a puppy from any pet store. Besides a large number of them coming from puppy mills, petstore puppies miss out on important socialization and are often more difficult to potty train since they are used to living in their own waste.

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Old 04-15-2006, 11:14 PM   #6
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i know someone who bought a puppy from a pet store and the dog is only one year and he has hip problems. ( poor puppy )

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Old 04-15-2006, 11:26 PM   #7
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Never, never, never get a puppy from a pet store, unless it's an adoption fair. Otherwise, you are most likely supporting a puppy mill.

http://puppymills.com/

Not to mention, you will probably end up with a lot more vet bills than you bargained for... Pet store puppies are often sickly, and have genetic or health problems, and later on down the line, psychological problems from bad breeding. >o.o<

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Old 04-15-2006, 11:36 PM   #8
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Cool Why are you interested in...

Why are you interested in a small breed dog? There are plenty of reputable breeders out there that sell large breed dogs for the same price as pups in the pet stores. I, for one, am going to have a litter of pups very soon (black labrador retreivers) and I think that I am selling them for a reasonable price. Labs are usually mellow, once you spay/neuter them, but they're pretty mellow in general. They're a medium-large breed, and great with people and kids. They also make pretty decent watchdogs (alerting you of a stranger's presence at the door, and keeping other dogs away from your home, without attacking, unless they are trained to do so.) If you (or anyoen, for that matter) are interested, please contact me for more information at [email protected] Welcome to take more than one

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Old 04-16-2006, 08:07 AM   #9
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Have you tried any of your local rescues for a dog? I know a lot of the rescues round here often get puppies up to 1 year old and they get all breeds in. I have 2 dogs who have been rescued for different reasons and I feel I am doing a wee bit to help by giving 2 wonderfull dogs the love and care they deserve . When my older boy passes on he is 10 years old and unfortunately Dobermans dont last to a very old age , it will be another rescue I will have they are so loving and always trying to please you.

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Old 04-16-2006, 09:14 AM   #10
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After so many years about the living conditions of these dogs that are bred for pet stores, many still purchase said puppies .


They are over bred, bred regardless of any genetic problems, deaf, blind, hips, on and on.

Oh, well, I guess some people have their heads in the sand.

Sandi

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