DogForum.net | Dog Forums and Community
     
 
Home Gallery Register Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Calendar Members List
Search
Go Back   DogForum.net | Dog Forums and Community > Dog Discussions > Puppies

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 10-23-2006, 01:13 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 3

Rep: 10 stacey is on a distinguished road
Unique Rep: 0
Default Taking food!

Our puppy again!

Harley is one of two golden retriever puppies we have.As well as us having problems with toilet training him, he has now started to take food from the table and out of the kids hands, just thought this was a puppy thing as his brother hangs around when food is to be had but has not taken it out of the kids hands and has never attempted to eat off a plate at the table while we are still eating.I find this one a difficult one as when i tell Bailey he leaves straight away, where Harley will carry on until i have to pull him down from the plate of bowl ETC ETC. Harley doesnt seem to care he has been told off and will just carry on regardless. Dont know what to do about this as want to sort it out should i isolate him when food is around what punishment should he have if he steals food. We have never given him our food and the kids are really good at not handing things to the dogs any help gratefully received.Still percevering with the toilet situation with Harley as well.

stacey is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2006, 01:53 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 6,806

Rep: 135 Jake2006 will become famous soon enoughJake2006 will become famous soon enough
Unique Rep: 64
Default

Send him out of the room. Its really important to get on top of this - if you read the posts re. Its me or the Dog you'll understand why. I'll post a little later as I'm still at work!

Jake2006 is offline Jake2006's Gallery  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2006, 02:09 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
SirKafka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 108

Rep: 12 SirKafka is on a distinguished road
Unique Rep: 2
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jake2006 View Post
Send him out of the room. Its really important to get on top of this - if you read the posts re. Its me or the Dog you'll understand why. I'll post a little later as I'm still at work!
Ha! I was thinking of exactly the same thing. Yes, it is very important that you get on top of this.
Quote:
Harley doesnt seem to care he has been told off and will just carry on regardless.
Not a good thing - how old is he? There are plenty of different things that you can do to train him out of it. Sending him out of the room shouldn't be the only option but you'll probably have to resort to that in the short term. If you don't train him out of it he'll steal food from other people, other children & you won't be able to eat off of your lap & neither will any guests to your home. Imagine having a BBQ with a bunch of guests over!!

A good friend of mine had a husky who did this & I had to just stop going over there for dinner, it was too much of a nightmare! Sadly she was put down after breaking her hip from a fall down the stairs - her weight became a real problem & ended up killing her.

Last edited by SirKafka; 10-23-2006 at 08:21 PM.. Reason: spelling

SirKafka is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2006, 05:09 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 6,806

Rep: 135 Jake2006 will become famous soon enoughJake2006 will become famous soon enough
Unique Rep: 64
Default Dogs Stealing Food

I've copied this from the Channel 4 website about two dogs with bad habitsw which Victoria Sitwell (dog trainer) attempted to retrain.

These two dogs are champion food thieves, leaping into the air and stealing food out of anyone’s hand or mouth. They stalk the family dinner table and steal anything food-related from any work surface, anywhere! Things have got so bad that the family hasn't been able to eat together at the dining room table for 2 years. The kids have to eat at the breakfast bar in shifts, or they eat standing up, or Susan will eat in another room with the dog, so at least the rest of the family can have peace. Once a year they’ll try Christmas dinner together but will have to bolt their food to beat the dogs. If they’re shut out of the room they’ll howl the house down leaving nerves in tatters and a bad case of indigestion.
The two dogs will fight over whatever they get their paws on, and also softie Dad Graham's attention. He’s been bitten on numerous occasions trying to separate them, and worse, Benjy has also bitten little Emily twice when he stole her food. Susan said he had to go but Graham couldn’t bring himself to put Benjy on Doggie Death Row.
To top it all, both dogs sleep with Graham and Susan every night, stopping
them from ever nodding off, making them tired the whole time. But if they shut the dogs out in the hallway they howl all night and keep everyone in the street awake. Love life? Forget it! If any action hots up in the bedroom, the dogs howl with increasing volume. It’s not exactly Barry White, so it’s time for Victoria Stilwell to show these two hounds the bedroom door.
Both dogs are in serious need of Victoria’s assistance, but can the family turn them around? Benjy has bitten before, and to the family’s dismay, he bites again. For Victoria there is only one answer – Benjy must be put down, but will Dad Graham be able to make the heart-breaking decision about the dog he loves?


The dog obviously had dominance issues; attacked one of the children such that she ended up in ER and then had to be put to sleep.

This was all for the want of training.

You must not accept this kind of behaviour from your dog. You must be firm with him - he is trying to be Alpha male. Send him out of the room. Make him stay in his 'box' (whatever he sleeps on). Use a very firm voice. This could very well save his life. If you don't train him you are asking for dominance issues, bad behaviour and even aggressive behaviour.

I hope this helps a little.

I hope our member Becky posts on this - she will have better ideas than me.

Jake2006 is offline Jake2006's Gallery  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2006, 05:20 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Rivsky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 109

Rep: 11 Rivsky is on a distinguished road
Unique Rep: 1
Default

I agree with Jake - it sounds like this dog definitely thinks he rules the roost and it's something you have to get on top of ASAP.

If you're having trouble getting him to stay in his bed perhaps try "anchoring" him to something that doesn't move via his lead and give him a rawhide or toy - just something to chew on to try and keep him occupied while you all are eating - eventually he will hopefully stay in his bed at meal times on his own without having to be tied there.

Rivsky is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2006, 07:37 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Kaos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Posts: 4,293

Rep: 264 Kaos is a jewel in the roughKaos is a jewel in the roughKaos is a jewel in the rough
Unique Rep: 68
Default

I agree this is one to crack down on right now. When it comes to stealing food, any punishment you can dish out after the event will probably be completely ineffectual as he has already rewarded himself for the behaviour (and food is the best motivator around for most dogs) thus making it more likely to reoccur. Prevention is much more effective than punishment (unless your timing is so good that you can catch him before his mouth reaches the food). I would find a way to separate your dog from the table at meal times straight away.

There are things you can do long term to make your life easier. It sounds like this particular dog lacks self control. You can work specifically around food by teaching him a 'leave it' cue, but general obedience work will also reinforce the self control message. For example, build up a good long 'stay' gradually, ask him to 'sit' before you agree to open the door or put his lead on, ask for a 'sit' before his dinner is produced, ask him to 'sit' before agreeing to play a game with his toy etc.

In my house I have found it helpful to feed the dogs their meals on the deck. This gives a really clear distinction for them - outdoor food is theirs, indoor food is not. The cats food is indoors so they understand they may not eat that, and are never fed when people are eating. The only food ever fed indoors is earned during a formal training session.

Kaos is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2006, 08:19 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
SirKafka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 108

Rep: 12 SirKafka is on a distinguished road
Unique Rep: 2
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaos
You can work specifically around food by teaching him a 'leave it' cue, but general obedience work will also reinforce the self control message. For example, build up a good long 'stay' gradually, ask him to 'sit' before you agree to open the door or put his lead on, ask for a 'sit' before his dinner is produced, ask him to 'sit' before agreeing to play a game with his toy etc.
That is exactly what I do with my dogs. They know the "leave it" command & they have to work for everything & anything that is a joy to them (except for affection!).

The dogs focus in the home should always be on you. With dinner time & treats I make them sit & wait until I give the "OK" for them to have it & they are ALWAYS looking at me, never the food. I put them in a "down" for treats & place the treat just in front of them then command them to "leave it" & they don't flinch. Only when they get the "OK" are they allowed to have the treat, so yes, general obedience training with these dogs will help immensely. I say DOGS rather than DOG because they should both know this stuff. It is possible that the more docile dog will pick up bad habits.

You did need to be careful though. Generally once a dog has something in its mouth it belongs to him. Teach your children NOT to try & remove something from the dogs mouth.

With our older dog, he'll do basically anything I tell him do. I'm still trying with the new dog. There are some things I can easily take from her mouth, others not so easy.

Last edited by SirKafka; 10-23-2006 at 08:36 PM..

SirKafka is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2006, 06:04 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 6,806

Rep: 135 Jake2006 will become famous soon enoughJake2006 will become famous soon enough
Unique Rep: 64
Default

Hi

another thought occurred to me. In a true pack when the alpha walks away from the food then rest of the pack can take it. So be careful not to send mixed messages to your dog.

EG if I'm eating something in the lounge and I put my plate down on coffee table to get something I tell Jake NO and he won't touch it. If i walked away without instruction to leave he would take it. When we first got him 6 months ago he would steal anything he could - he's a different dog now through reward.

I can put a treat at the end of his nose and tell him not to touch he - he leaves it until he's given permission - (nothing is for free -) his mouth waters and his whole body sometimes trembles - but he dare not touch it.

Jake2006 is offline Jake2006's Gallery  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2006, 03:03 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Becky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Vermont
Posts: 371

Rep: 24 Becky is on a distinguished road
Unique Rep: 11
Default

I guess I'll be the odd ball out. I don't think food stealing has anything to do with dominance and everything to do with opportunity. Not only that, but food stealing is very self-rewarding. Every time he steals, the behavior is reinforced and more likely to reoccur.

First, "break" the habit. Don't leave him in a situation where he can self-reward. Crate him during dinner time or take him with you when you leave the room.

While you do that, work on your stays, drop its, and leave its. An under trained dog will not drop forbidden items, won't leave something tempting, and most certainly won't stay when no one is looking.


* ETA: I just reread Kaos's post and realized we've said almost the same thing, sorry.
__________________
"We abuse land because we regard it as a commodity belonging to us. When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect." - Aldo Leopold, A Sand County Almanac

Becky is offline Becky's Gallery  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2006, 03:10 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Kaos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Posts: 4,293

Rep: 264 Kaos is a jewel in the roughKaos is a jewel in the roughKaos is a jewel in the rough
Unique Rep: 68
Default

Yup - I totally agree, nothing to do with dominance, just poor manners and lack of self control. A training issue.

Kaos is offline  
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:30 AM.

Shogun Interactive Development Copyright © 2006-2015 Shogun Interactive Development. All rights reserved.