DogForum.net | Dog Forums and Community
     
 
Home Gallery Register Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Calendar Members List
Search
Go Back   DogForum.net | Dog Forums and Community > Dog Discussions > Puppies

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 10-06-2008, 04:59 AM   #1
kiz
Member
 
kiz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Rutland, UK
Posts: 38

Rep: 10 kiz is on a distinguished road
Unique Rep: 0
Default Tugging at trousers....

Can anyone help with any advice when a puppy tugs and pulls at the bottom of trousers?

Is it as case of keeping up with the stern "No's"?

kiz is offline kiz's Gallery  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2008, 10:08 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
CurlySue's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Hampshire, UK
Posts: 2,172

Rep: 42 CurlySue is on a distinguished road
Unique Rep: 18
Default

Hi! Haha, I really sympathise....terrier puppies (I assume you are speaking of the cute pup in your avatar?) are especially fond of ankle biting and trouser savaging. See pic of small black trouser-tearing terrier in my avatar.

I have no fail-safe cure for you I'm afraid, but what I can tell you is that the stern "No!" is actually rewarding the puppy for his antics, by giving him attention! And what's more, if/when you pull your leg away, you are effectively encouraging him to chase and kill his "prey" (stupid as it seems when you have 3kg of cute puppy growling at your sock).

Nellie, my Patterdale, is now 14 months old, but from a very early age she would savage our ankles at the slightest provocation. Terriers are bred to chase small moving prey close to the ground - what better to practice on than your flapping trouser legs? She isn't 100% cured of this rather annoying habit, but we have managed to cut out 80% of ankle attacks with a simple, rather frustrating but eventually effective method.

When the puppy launches for your trouser leg, latches on and starts tugging and snarling, stop dead still. Fold your arms, gaze into space, look at anything apart from the pup and say nothing. Don't move, and certainly don't try to yank your ankle out of the dog's mouth!

Ok he won't let go instantly, and will vary his attempts to elicit a reaction by tugging harder and more frantically, or dancing around back into your line of vision, barking like a loon. Ignore everything until the puppy has given up, and is standing quietly (probably with sad droopy tail) looking the other way. Only then can you give some enthusiastic praise, maybe even a treat, before going on your way again.

Now, the inevitable reaction initially will be for the pup to redirect his attack on your trousers as you walk away. It can take a while for this method to sink in, as trouser-savaging is self-rewarding behaviour, so be prepared to have to repeat yourself over and over, ad infinitum - in the house, walking down the stairs, sitting on the loo (or is that just my dog?) out on walks, etc etc etc. Its frustrating and will drive you to distraction, but try to stick with it. Once the pup knows that trouser tugging achieves nothing, the behaviour will fade. My husband took Nellie to work with him from the moment she was old enough, and believe me she drove him mad with her ankle biting - but she steadily desisted. He only has to re-tie his boot laces a couple of times a week now, instead of 25 times a day.........

She now only does it under extreme provocation - the minute her paws touch the grass in the park, she is expecting me to throw a ball for her. If I fail to produce the goods, my ankles bear the brunt of her displeasure. If she is "stimulated" by some other means and is frustrated in some way, she may resort to ankle biting.

Its not ideal but she is still very young. At least I have managed to stop her attacking the ankles of small children and local runners, which was rather embarrassing........

Good luck, let us know how it goes!

Susie x

EDIT - further to Zoe's very useful post below about a shaker bottle or spray bottle, yes these deterrents are very effective. But even though they bandy these methods around on TV programs like Dog Borstal etc willy nilly, these are generally seen as professional techniques - this means that your timing has to be impeccable if you are going to use a deterrent technique, otherwise you could end up with a very confuzzled mutt. Or worse, a puppy who is afraid to interact with you at all. Not to be a bearer of doom and gloom, just to warn you to be careful!

Last edited by CurlySue; 10-06-2008 at 11:31 AM..

CurlySue is offline CurlySue's Gallery  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2008, 11:17 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
zoe-gee's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 207

Rep: 13 zoe-gee is on a distinguished road
Unique Rep: 3
Default

My next door neighbours terrier would always bit you ankle or shoe if you began to run!
If the stern no's are not working then maybe you should try things like using a bottle with things in that make a noise when you shake it so when the puppy does tug at your trousers shake the bottle and give one stern no aswell. Or other things like a spray bottle.
Hope i helped.xx
__________________
"I've been fleeced by SHEPLOVR!" (Thanks!).
"I've got thedo you?"

zoe-gee is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2008, 12:14 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
sheplovr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: U.S.
Posts: 9,482

Rep: 230 sheplovr has a spectacular aura aboutsheplovr has a spectacular aura aboutsheplovr has a spectacular aura about
Unique Rep: 88
Default

Pull the pup or dog away from your ankel or pants, make it let go, say a firm NO NO. Hand it one of its toys and walk away. If it continues to follow do the same as it is doing this for attention.

Just pull it from your pants or anybodys and hand a toy and tell it NO before giving the toy soon as you pull if from you, then ignore it. Run the vacumn, dust, do anything to ingore the pup. It will soon become so bored trying to vi for attention it will get its toy. Keep all his/her toys in the same corner and room in a box, basket etc. That way it will know what it can play with.

When it does get a toy sometime pet and praise it, if started to knaw on you, get up and walk away. I have raised many many pups from Germany and working with my litters and they start biting my shoes, soaks, etc. I just leave the pack or litter and let them play together. It will work if your persistant.
__________________


"Don't make the mistake of treating your dogs like humans, or they'll treat you like dogs."



~PAT~


sheplovr is offline sheplovr's Gallery  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2008, 01:28 PM   #5
kiz
Member
 
kiz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Rutland, UK
Posts: 38

Rep: 10 kiz is on a distinguished road
Unique Rep: 0
Default

Thanks for your advice everyone.....

Quote:
Originally Posted by CurlySue View Post
Hi! Haha, I really sympathise....terrier puppies (I assume you are speaking of the cute pup in your avatar?) are especially fond of ankle biting and trouser savaging. See pic of small black trouser-tearing terrier in my avatar.

I have no fail-safe cure for you I'm afraid, but what I can tell you is that the stern "No!" is actually rewarding the puppy for his antics, by giving him attention! And what's more, if/when you pull your leg away, you are effectively encouraging him to chase and kill his "prey" (stupid as it seems when you have 3kg of cute puppy growling at your sock).

Nellie, my Patterdale, is now 14 months old, but from a very early age she would savage our ankles at the slightest provocation. Terriers are bred to chase small moving prey close to the ground - what better to practice on than your flapping trouser legs? She isn't 100% cured of this rather annoying habit, but we have managed to cut out 80% of ankle attacks with a simple, rather frustrating but eventually effective method.

When the puppy launches for your trouser leg, latches on and starts tugging and snarling, stop dead still. Fold your arms, gaze into space, look at anything apart from the pup and say nothing. Don't move, and certainly don't try to yank your ankle out of the dog's mouth!

Ok he won't let go instantly, and will vary his attempts to elicit a reaction by tugging harder and more frantically, or dancing around back into your line of vision, barking like a loon. Ignore everything until the puppy has given up, and is standing quietly (probably with sad droopy tail) looking the other way. Only then can you give some enthusiastic praise, maybe even a treat, before going on your way again.

Now, the inevitable reaction initially will be for the pup to redirect his attack on your trousers as you walk away. It can take a while for this method to sink in, as trouser-savaging is self-rewarding behaviour, so be prepared to have to repeat yourself over and over, ad infinitum - in the house, walking down the stairs, sitting on the loo (or is that just my dog?) out on walks, etc etc etc. Its frustrating and will drive you to distraction, but try to stick with it. Once the pup knows that trouser tugging achieves nothing, the behaviour will fade. My husband took Nellie to work with him from the moment she was old enough, and believe me she drove him mad with her ankle biting - but she steadily desisted. He only has to re-tie his boot laces a couple of times a week now, instead of 25 times a day.........

She now only does it under extreme provocation - the minute her paws touch the grass in the park, she is expecting me to throw a ball for her. If I fail to produce the goods, my ankles bear the brunt of her displeasure. If she is "stimulated" by some other means and is frustrated in some way, she may resort to ankle biting.

Its not ideal but she is still very young. At least I have managed to stop her attacking the ankles of small children and local runners, which was rather embarrassing........

Good luck, let us know how it goes!

Susie x

EDIT - further to Zoe's very useful post below about a shaker bottle or spray bottle, yes these deterrents are very effective. But even though they bandy these methods around on TV programs like Dog Borstal etc willy nilly, these are generally seen as professional techniques - this means that your timing has to be impeccable if you are going to use a deterrent technique, otherwise you could end up with a very confuzzled mutt. Or worse, a puppy who is afraid to interact with you at all. Not to be a bearer of doom and gloom, just to warn you to be careful!
I've started to do this and it kinda working. He loses interest very quickly when I stand still and dont tug back.

Now I have to work on the kids getting the hang of not tugging back

kiz is offline kiz's Gallery  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2008, 02:26 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
sheplovr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: U.S.
Posts: 9,482

Rep: 230 sheplovr has a spectacular aura aboutsheplovr has a spectacular aura aboutsheplovr has a spectacular aura about
Unique Rep: 88
Default

Good honey keep up the good work and the pup will quit that bad habit. Hang in there and be patient with your pet.
__________________


"Don't make the mistake of treating your dogs like humans, or they'll treat you like dogs."



~PAT~


sheplovr is offline sheplovr's Gallery  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2008, 08:28 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
CurlySue's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Hampshire, UK
Posts: 2,172

Rep: 42 CurlySue is on a distinguished road
Unique Rep: 18
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kiz View Post
Thanks for your advice everyone.....



I've started to do this and it kinda working. He loses interest very quickly when I stand still and dont tug back.

Now I have to work on the kids getting the hang of not tugging back
LOL, good luck with that! Glad you are seeing some effects.

CurlySue is offline CurlySue's Gallery  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2008, 09:02 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Kaos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Posts: 4,293

Rep: 264 Kaos is a jewel in the roughKaos is a jewel in the roughKaos is a jewel in the rough
Unique Rep: 68
Default

Yes, great advice there from CurlySue (resident terrorist authority), sounds like you are on the right track.

You might also want to consider teaching your dog to play tuggy with an appropriate tug toy. The important part is that you teach 'off' and 'take it' to stop and start the game. Interrupt the game frequently and ask your pup to 'off' - the reward is you restart the game again by giving the cue to 'take it'. This will provide a legal outlet for the desire to tug, as well as giving you a cue ('off') that you can use when your pup grabs a trouser leg or other undesirable object, making it easy to redirect onto the tug toy. It also starts training in some self control which is always a good idea, as well as giving you a valuable reward you can put to use in future with other types of training - many competitive agility handlers use tug games as a reward.

Kaos is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2008, 09:10 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Kaos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Posts: 4,293

Rep: 264 Kaos is a jewel in the roughKaos is a jewel in the roughKaos is a jewel in the rough
Unique Rep: 68
Default

Video clip showing how to train polite tuggy:

http://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/tug-war

Kaos is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2008, 06:58 AM   #10
kiz
Member
 
kiz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Rutland, UK
Posts: 38

Rep: 10 kiz is on a distinguished road
Unique Rep: 0
Default

Here is is after a good game of (training) tug!


kiz is offline kiz's Gallery  
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:03 AM.

Shogun Interactive Development Copyright 2006-2015 Shogun Interactive Development. All rights reserved.