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Unread 04-09-2012, 02:08 PM   #11
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Ama, I was wondering about the wrinkles too. I'm glad you asked. Your first post got me thinking why I haven't seen any where I live. A woman I used to work with, has a Ridgeback mix, and she's beautiful. I started checking the internet, and they have a very interesting backround. They are really cute little puppies, but are just stunning as adults.
TRD1, thanks for posting. You shared some really interesting info.

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Unread 04-09-2012, 02:15 PM   #12
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*laughs* Yeah, it is kind of random/odd question. When I first saw the pups of this breed my thought process went as following;
"Aw they're so cute!"

and then

"Why are they so wrinkly?"

XD

I couldn't find any information about it anywhere, but them growing into the extra skin does make sense! Way more than thier fur type being the reason,

@DeeLind7 - Glad I wasn't the only one wondering about the wrinkles, they do have an interesting background and are stunning as adults too{Wish I could find some owners where I live so I could get a feel of the breed *and because I want to pet/interact with one* }

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Unread 04-09-2012, 02:17 PM   #13
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Great to have an expert join, welcome!

I've never owned a Thai Ridge, but my impression of them have been that they are rather sharp/hard. Your description sounds like they're much more human oriented, and any aggression is fear based?

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Unread 04-09-2012, 04:56 PM   #14
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Thank you for the welcome everyone!

Ama - where are you located? There may be a TRD lurking near you

Monstermom - I wouldn't say they're "hard" as far as training goes.. I'm used to "hard" meaning "They can keep on ticking no matter what you do to them" and that's not true with a TRD. If you are hard on them, they shut down completely. Good lord.. if I seriously raised my voice to my female (which I've never had to do) - she'd probably pee her pants and hate me forever.

Any aggression from them is going to be fear based. They were used (and I'm sure still used in some areas of Thailand) as guard dogs.. however they are not good protection dogs (big difference). As a guard dog, they will follow around the weirdo person lurking about and alert their person about the stranger.. but they will likely not attack unless they feel threatened. Think of them more along the lines of a coyote or a wolf.. they will watch and watch and watch but are not out to attack humans by any means unless they really have to. If you chase a wild animal.. they usually run away.. and a TRD will do the same if they have an out. However, if they do feel threatened, they are freaky fast little ninjas and their warning signs are pretty subtle compared to some other breeds.

In competition obedience.. Stand for Exam is the toughest exercise to master. Even the best trained TRD will completely dislike a stranger coming at them to touch his/her head - it's possible to do, but takes lots and lots of work.

It is not recommended at all to use them for any sort of protection or Schutzhund work - they are too independent and rather unstable for that type of work. I'm sure it can be done.. but the last person I know of that trained for it (and I'm not even sure how well or experienced that person was) but her female attacked a toddler in a bathtub because the toddler was banging a wooden spoon on the tub. Not really a good combo to have around.. a dog working on protection skills and a toddler with a noisy object but add the instability and independent nature of the TRD breed into the mix and it spells disaster and unfortunately for the toddler it amounted to many stitches on the head

They are incredibly human oriented and will trust "their" human beyond belief.. but not so much other humans unless they are acclimated to such a thing. I'm lucky to be able to bring my girl to work with me so she gets lots of exposure to new people and that has helped a lot.. but if there is anyone that is a little too weird.. well forget it.. she's not polite about letting them know either, lol. Once a TRD feels comfortable with someone they will go right up to them and be fine, but it takes them longer than most breeds (generally speaking of course) to trust.

A Thai friend of mine described a TRD she had while growing up in Thailand as being incredibly bonded to her, so much so that she had to return every six weeks from school to feed the dog because her dog refused to eat when she was away and there was only so much force feeding her mother could do. The stories of their devotion to their owners are plentiful, however, that doesn't mean that they will be at ones beck and call either. They can be rather aloof.. like an afghan or other sighthounds out there. Many of them enjoy the company of other dogs and I've noticed a lot of them really do like cats, but do they NEED those other dogs? Probably not - as long as they have their person.

Thank you all again for the warm welcome.

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Unread 06-25-2012, 08:41 PM   #15
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TRD1, Raven is the same way he hates being away from me even when someone is watching him for me. He'll sit by the door unfilled I get back. He is easy to train in obedience but still has that independence. The only thing that was difficult was to train him not to chew up the carpet or furniture when I leave him alone for a short period of time. but in all he is great and beyond comparison. I had a dobermann a while back he was great and would never compare the two, but at times you can't help to notice the differences.

Last edited by vagreys; 06-25-2012 at 09:52 PM..

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Unread 06-25-2012, 10:10 PM   #16
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Hi tha1n2,

Yes, many TRD have some degree of separation issues. They REALLY like being with their people, lol

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Unread 06-25-2012, 10:35 PM   #17
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I was looking at your rescue site I really must commend you and your members on the great work you are doing. I really hope you guys make an impact and keep these great TRD's from being abused. It's so sad in the short period of time that they made their way to the west that it has already started.

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Unread 06-25-2012, 10:41 PM   #18
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Thank you for swinging on over and checking it out

We are a small group, but we are the only 501c3 dedicated solely to Thai ridgeback dogs in the U.S. What we mostly see are dogs that are not with the right people - they are not for everyone and require a lot more attention than the average dog. I know - many 'breed specific' people will say that about their breed, but I feel it's more true with a more primitive breed.

We talk to so many people about different ways to hopefully work on some of the issues they're having, but sometimes, it's just best for the dog to find a new place to land.

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Unread 06-26-2012, 01:55 AM   #19
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I have to ask, do the thai ridgeback have shar pei in the ancestry tree when the breed was produced? a lot of the traits sounds similar as well as the skin
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Unread 06-26-2012, 12:06 PM   #20
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From what I have heard, history wise they don't know to much about their past. Their history is similar to the korean Jindo, very old and primitive. Not developed like most pure breds. Meaning they weren't cross bred to get a particular dog. There are two big breeders in Thailand, one is an American that runs a puppy mill that mixes with no second thought and the other is Thai woman that is mixing to get new colors like brindle.
I am not an expert just done some research and could be wrong.

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