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Old 09-13-2012, 01:27 PM   #11
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There is a wonderful ACD rescue in the state I live in. If I didn't already have one, I'd try to get one from them if they'd find me worthy.
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Old 09-13-2012, 01:42 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Lucky Nucky Pie View Post
Thank you all for your responses!!! I am so happy you are taking time to help me and explain to me!!!

I know that if I do get a herding breed, since he or she will be my first one, I'll try to find one that is good for me as a novice in training. A dog that is a little more amenable and forgiving in training than the super high-drive and super high-energy dog that needs experience to focus it. If I want more drive and energy, I can always wait til I have more experience. I think my dog will do good with herding instinct bc he can herd the cows! I think I can ask the breeder for a dog that is good for beginner like me, but also who can do what I want to do with the dog. I can also find one in the shelter if I see ACDs or mixes of ACD around! But the more I think, the more the breeder sounds like a better choice since she has lots of connections and can answer all the questions I have and everything. Though, I really wanted to rescue, too.
A rescue could be a good start The people there can really help you find one that has the right kind of temperament and energy level for you.

The amount of drive can depend on the lines and how the dog was bred. I've seen border collies who have almost zero herding instinct, probably because they were bred more as pets. A friend of mine has an Aussie that's like that, she'll chase their goats, but she doesn't have the control, it's just prey drive rather than actual herding. It doesn't take away from her intelligence or trainability. I wanted a crazy one (and I do say that affectionately ) so I went with working lines...His parents herded sheep and horses. The owner had a 1000 acre ranch and the horses would just disappear on it. He'd take a couple collies out, tell them to get the horses, and 15 minutes later they'd be back with the whole herd.

This is the kind of stuff I get to deal with from this dog:


He was trying to herd a beetle. I have another photo of him trying to herd a baby scrub jay in my boyfriends backyard.

But really, no matter what you get from where, it'll still be a learning experience. A rescue should have a variety of personalities and temperaments within the breed, so I think you'd be more likely to get what you need and get a dog that will be more forgiving.
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Old 09-13-2012, 01:45 PM   #13
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Sugardog, nice post, and what a great beetle hearding dog you have there!

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Old 09-13-2012, 04:30 PM   #14
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Oh! Thank you guys! I didn't know that rescues could be so helpful because I really do love the idea of helping rescue a dog and can see me being much more happy with a young adult dog than a puppy since I would be working somewhere and puppies are 100% supervision and it isn't fair to the puppy if I can't give that all the time!!! I would always have someone to watch if I do get a puppy (my grandmother and grandfather are retired and they are the ones on the farm), but I find the idea of a young adult to be more attractive (now that I know that rescues could be more helpful than breeders!!!) because I can just start training and not have to worry about if the temperaments change as they mature into young adults and then into adults. For example, my grandparents got Oats when he was very young (his mom died) and he matured into a very serious, non-playful, non-affectionate dog, but very devoted to family.

If I go the rescue route, I think do love an ACD more because I really like their look (short hair!!!) and temperament and I'm sure that with all the ACDs in need of a home, the rescue can find one that matches me.

Thank you all for your replies and for helping me work out what is best for me, my home, my current dog, and my future dog.

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Old 09-13-2012, 05:12 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucky Nucky Pie View Post
Oh! Thank you guys! I didn't know that rescues could be so helpful because I really do love the idea of helping rescue a dog and can see me being much more happy with a young adult dog than a puppy since I would be working somewhere and puppies are 100% supervision and it isn't fair to the puppy if I can't give that all the time!!! I would always have someone to watch if I do get a puppy (my grandmother and grandfather are retired and they are the ones on the farm), but I find the idea of a young adult to be more attractive (now that I know that rescues could be more helpful than breeders!!!) because I can just start training and not have to worry about if the temperaments change as they mature into young adults and then into adults. For example, my grandparents got Oats when he was very young (his mom died) and he matured into a very serious, non-playful, non-affectionate dog, but very devoted to family.

If I go the rescue route, I think do love an ACD more because I really like their look (short hair!!!) and temperament and I'm sure that with all the ACDs in need of a home, the rescue can find one that matches me.

Thank you all for your replies and for helping me work out what is best for me, my home, my current dog, and my future dog.
That's what the Forum is all about. You'll get lots of advise, but most of all, we agree to disagree. Not everyone feels the same way on every topic. It's nice sometimes to just get input from others, when trying to make a decision, or just need general help.

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Old 09-13-2012, 05:32 PM   #16
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I love ACD's. I never owned one till I got Frodo amd I was told he was a border collie /aussie mix. It was a little confusing to me when numerous people would comment on him being a blue heeler! He's quirky but that's why i love him. Never a dull moment in our house!
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Old 09-13-2012, 05:33 PM   #17
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Thank you so much again for being honest and giving lots of good information! Is it better for me to contact an ACD rescue now or should I wait til I'm graduated and out of school and in a job first? Also, do you guys have any recommendations about any ACD rescues that you think I should look into/would be most helpful?

This is a link that I got from Google and they seem helpful! I like their information about the dogs!!! Australian Cattle Dog Rescue Association - Home

Sorry for being so clueless!!! This would be my first dog that I did so much planning for and I just want to be the best I can be for the dog.

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Old 09-13-2012, 06:13 PM   #18
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I would absolutely wait until you are settled into a job, simply because that is a stressful time of your life, and may change your living arrangements etc. Once you are established and know your routine you will be in a much better place to take on your new dog.

I can't comment about rescues over there, but here in NZ there are way too many herding dogs bred on farms, and they often do not do well in average pet dog homes, so there is a never ending supply in rescue. My own two herding mixes who are now my competitive dogs were both rescued at just under a year old. Personally I like that age because you can get a really good idea of basic temperament, and they are easy to put new behaviours on. Here you would have no problem finding an ACD or ACD mix rescue suitable for your needs.

I think the reason ACDs are considered harder dogs than say the border collies is because they were bred to work dry stock, and selected for their ability to stand up to a bull if necessary. Mine is only a cross yet he instinctively will do the typical ACD grab at heels of a cow given the chance. A border collie or eye dog is more likely to stand of the stock rather than get in there with teeth and often won't be keen to work bulls. They are not always the most dog tolerant breed, so I would be dog / dog testing carefully before taking on a rescue, and monitoring play to make sure things don't get too rough. The upshot is that like most of the herding dogs they were bred to work closely with humans and to be easily trainable. I can't imagine dogs better suited to clicker training than those from the herding breeds.

Most people run into problems with their herding dogs because they don't provide sufficient exercise, training and / or mental stimulation. Personally I find them very easy to live with but they suit my lifestyle, and love of training.

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Old 09-13-2012, 07:48 PM   #19
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Thanks so much for the informative post! It really, really helps. I think that the herding style of the ACD would work better with our cattle anyways that that of the BC. Our cows and bull are just ornery, especially when they have calves! I know that I see next to no Aussies in the shelter around this area because the breeder here is very careful about who the dogs go to. I know that there's a lot of Amish who breed ACD, which is why they are more common in shelter, especially they are mixed with gun-dog breeds like German Short-haired Pointer.

The dog tolerance worries me a little though, but like you said, dog/dog testing. I do know that my own dog always found it easy to get along with other herding breeds (especially well socialized ones), whereas he doesn't like the way a boxer-dog plays and doesn't like labradors much either, but he isn't a bully and usually just goes away or find a new place. He is very submissive in behaviors, you can say, which makes him easy to bully, I think. He's always was okay with the circling/chasing behaviors of herding breeds though from the dogs he plays with and meets (his best friend was Shortie, a sheltie). I think if I get a young dog like you, just under a year or a little over, it could be easier for the dog to like mine. But definitely, I will supervise play, especially since Oats can sometimes be sensitive, especially when he is feeling sick. Are ACDs very different in play from other herding breeds?

I know Oats took to clicker training very well. The hardest was getting him motivated! So, I am excited to see how my next dog takes to it!!! I am a student of psychology as well and love to apply what I learn from my school to dog training!

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Old 09-13-2012, 08:25 PM   #20
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I would absolutely wait until you are settled into a job, simply because that is a stressful time of your life, and may change your living arrangements etc. Once you are established and know your routine you will be in a much better place to take on your new dog.

I can't comment about rescues over there, but here in NZ there are way too many herding dogs bred on farms, and they often do not do well in average pet dog homes, so there is a never ending supply in rescue. My own two herding mixes who are now my competitive dogs were both rescued at just under a year old. Personally I like that age because you can get a really good idea of basic temperament, and they are easy to put new behaviours on. Here you would have no problem finding an ACD or ACD mix rescue suitable for your needs.

I think the reason ACDs are considered harder dogs than say the border collies is because they were bred to work dry stock, and selected for their ability to stand up to a bull if necessary. Mine is only a cross yet he instinctively will do the typical ACD grab at heels of a cow given the chance. A border collie or eye dog is more likely to stand of the stock rather than get in there with teeth and often won't be keen to work bulls. They are not always the most dog tolerant breed, so I would be dog / dog testing carefully before taking on a rescue, and monitoring play to make sure things don't get too rough. The upshot is that like most of the herding dogs they were bred to work closely with humans and to be easily trainable. I can't imagine dogs better suited to clicker training than those from the herding breeds.

Most people run into problems with their herding dogs because they don't provide sufficient exercise, training and / or mental stimulation. Personally I find them very easy to live with but they suit my lifestyle, and love of training.

What is an eye dog? Does that refer to a herding dog that would rather stare down a cow than bite its heels? This is one of the reason Frodo was rehomed so many times before I got him. It definitely is a challenge to keep him mentally and physically stimulated but I'm committed to it and he is doing so much better than when we first got him.
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