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Old 10-15-2015, 01:54 PM   #11
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British trooper W. Williamson rescues a puppy from the ruins of a shell-damaged house in Geilenkirchen, Germany, in November 1944. (AP Photo)



A Marine Corps dog handler comforts his German shepherd while the dog is X-rayed after being shot by a Japanese sniper on Bougainville, The dog died of its injuries. National Archives via the National World War II Museum



Marine Cpl. Gunner Schmitt, 23, from Janesville, Wis., and a puppy that the Marines had named Willie, both take an afternoon nap on the porch of an office building in an abandoned industrial complex where the Camp Pendleton 3rd Battalion, 1st Marines, have been living for the past five days in Baghdad, Wednesday, April 16, 2003. The puppy belongs to the population of stray dogs that also live in the complex. (AP Photo/North County Times/Hayne Palmour)




In this photo release by the National Archives via National World War II Museum, Butch, a sentry dog, stands guard over Pfc. Rez P. Hester of the Marine Corps’ 7th War Dog Platoon on Iwo Jima in this undated photograph from the National Archives. The photo will be part of an exhibit, titled "Loyal Force: Animals at War" at the National World War II Museum in New Orleans

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Old 10-15-2015, 02:18 PM   #12
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Lt. George A. Custer with dog. Photograph from the main eastern theater of war, the Peninsular Campaign, May-August 1862. Selected Civil War photographs, 1861-1865 (Library of Congress)



Uncle Sam's war dog sentries have seen their first overseas duty in Puerto Rico Jan. 13, 1943. 'Adrian' the police dog sentry can't wait to leave his portable Kennel. With him left to right, are Private Louis Robbins, dog trainer of Long Island City, Pfc. Juan Gotos of Puerto Rico, and Pvt. Carlos Rodriguez, also of Puerto Rico. (AP Photo)



Private First Class Norman Diamond of Brooklyn, New York gives a congratulatory pat to "Staff Sergeant Basic" and "Private First Class Adler," who have just received promotions under authority of DL (Dog Land) regulation 0000-900. They are mascots of a U.S. Signal Service company somewhere in India. 1942 Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection (Library of Congress)



An undated handout photo, released to the media on Friday, March 27, 2009, shows War rescue dog Rip rescuing a trapped victim from a bombed building in Poplar, London, U.K. Rip, a stray dog who became a World War II hero after being found homeless and starving in a bombing raid in London.



New York troops in Corbie, France, celebrate the signing of the Armistice Treaty, Nov. 11, 1918. (AP Photo)

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Old 10-15-2015, 08:44 PM   #13
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Wonderful post! Thanks!
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Old 10-16-2015, 02:03 AM   #14
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That was very interesting. I had not know that the Japanese, Germans, Russians, etc had used dogs. I had just assumed we were the only ones. When I was a kid a guyup the lane had a German Shepherd that had been an army dog. Charlie had been his handler. He said the dog had to be "de=programed" before he could bring the dog home with him. Colonel had not been in WWII, but I assume he ha in had been in Korea, as Charlie was and Colonel had been his dog while in the army.

Also I had not known so many actual breeds had been used, tho some very little. I watched a special on the Military channel a few years ago about the dogs in the pacific. Their handles, now old men, talked about the dogs and some had had lost their dogs there....and talking about them brought tears..
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Old 10-16-2015, 03:53 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 3 goldens View Post
I watched a special on the Military channel a few years ago about the dogs in the pacific. Their handles, now old men, talked about the dogs and some had had lost their dogs there....and talking about them brought tears..

Always faithful was a really impressive video. 50 years later the dogs still get the respect they deserve.

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Old 10-16-2015, 03:56 AM   #16
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Some wardogs in 1915










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Old 10-16-2015, 04:00 AM   #17
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some different pics from WW2








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Old 10-16-2015, 04:04 AM   #18
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Old 10-16-2015, 04:37 AM   #19
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The noise and strain that shattered the nerves of many of his comrades did not impair Stubby's spirits. Not because he was unconscious of danger. His angry howl while a battle raged and his mad canter from one part of the lines to another indicated realization."
- New York Times Obituary

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Old 10-16-2015, 04:43 AM   #20
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Stubby the War Dog was wounded in combat in April 1918, when he was hit with a German hand grenade while participating in the assault on the German town of Schieprey (now there's a sentence I never thought I'd write). Despite receiving shrapnel wounds to his forelimbs and chest, Stubby survived the grenade blast, lived through some emergency surgery, and spent his convalescence time cheering up the wounded men in the field hospital. He returned to action a few months later and helped participate in the liberation of Chateau Thierry, a deed that got the French babes living in the city so pumped up that they made him a chamois blanked decorated with the flags of the Allied countries to thank him. The men of the 102nd, for their part, made Stubby a jacket designed to look like an American military uniform, and then they decorated it with Stubby's name, rank, and medals – medals that included the Purple Heart, the Republic of France Grande War Medal, the Medal of Verdun, and medals for every campaign in which he'd served.

While serving in the Argonne Forest during the Meuse-Argonne campaign of September 1918, Stubby was patrolling the trenches when he discovered a camouflaged German spy hiding out mapping the Allied trenches. Stubby smelled the Kraut on this dude and started freaking the hell out, woofing at this dude like a damned psychotic bark machine, and nothing this poor chump could do to stop Stubby from freaking out on him. Finally, convinced that he wasn't going to shut the damn dog up, the German turned and ran for it. That was just the opportunity Stubby was looking for. The dog hauled ass, ran this guy down from behind, launched itself like a hair-covered missile, and bit into his calf, dropping the spy to the ground. Then Stubby bit the dude on the ass and locked his jaws shut, refusing to give this dude his ass back (or let him move in any way at all) until Americans showed up to arrest him. For his actions, Stubby the Ass-Biting Maniac Dog was given a battlefield promotion to the rank of Sergeant, which, awesomely enough, meant that the dog now outranked his owner, who was only a Corporal by this point. Stubby became the first dog to be promoted to a rank the army, and, as a b###hin' side note, when the Americans brought the German spy back to camp they stripped the prisoner of his Iron Cross and pinned the German military medal on the dog's jacket instead

After the war, Sergeant Stubby was smuggled back to the states, where he was an instant celebrity. He inducted into the American Legion, offered free food for life from the YMCA, and whenever he went out of war bonds promotion tours five-star hotels would relax their "no dogs allowed" policy for the canine war hero. He went to the White House twice, met three presidents, and in 1921 the American overall commander "Black Jack" Pershing personally pinned a one-of-a-kind "Dog Hero Gold Medal" on Stubby's military jacket.

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