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Old 01-08-2013, 09:15 PM   #1
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Hello Everyone. I'm new here and I joined because I'm looking for advice on a future breed of dog that can fit me. Currently I'm a 20year old male college student who commutes from home and I honestly have to much spare time lol. My time living at home though is still limited and I'm not sure how much longer I'd be here before I find my own place but for now I'm stable. I just want to prepare and research in advance as I wouldnt plant on adding the dog for 1-2 years after I prepare and know what breed I want.

Anyways we already have two dogs, a 4year female old Boston terrier(Molly) and a 12year old cairn terrier(Banjo). They are both great dogs but they are more bonded with my mother even though they love everyone and they aren't really what I'm looking for in a dog at the moment. With one of the major things being a jogging partner which neither of them are capable of as Banjo has sever arthritis and Molly is dead after a walk around the block .

Honestly what I'm looking for is a dog between 30-90lbs and athletic as I said early I'd like a jogging partner. Outside of that aspect I'd like a dog that is really a go anywhere do anything type of dog; go downtown, the beach, out with friends, hiking, ect.

As far as sociability goes I'd like it to be at least friendly towards strangers, doesn't need to go nuts and love everybody it meets like your classic labrador would but as long as it isn't going to suspicious and snap at anyone it doesn't know if they try to pet it that'll be fine. Also I have a large family and when they have parties everyone bring their dogs, for example X-mas there was 7 dogs in my grandmothers house, so at least decent sociability would be nice.

I also like dogs that are like shadows and prefer to be by your side and follow u around and at the end of the day will lay dog by your feet or up on the couch and watch tv with you.

I'd also like to go do activities with the dog, depending on the breed and what they naturally like doing, but thats still in the works. Intelligence and trainability are also important qualities.

As far as grooming, honestly the less I have to do the better, I can do a little bit but if I'm having to spend everyday brushing the dogs or several hours a week doing it its not the breed for me. I also prefer average shedding or less.

There are a few breeds I've liked but being that I'm 20 and still living at home, worse case scenario is in a few years I move into a small apartment with no backyard so obviously a dog like a border collie would be a "no-go". But I'd rather say away from giving suggestions as to what I like and see what breeds you all think could fit me.

Growing up I had a yellow lab and today theres Molly and Banjo. My father has an english bulldog and a "boxador" pup also. On top of that all the dogs in my family so I do have experience with dogs and I have a good understanding of dog psychology on top of that. This would be my first dog that I'd be the primary care taker for though but I know I'm not a novice dog owner. Hopefully this isn't asking to much though, thanks in advance.

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Old 01-08-2013, 09:37 PM   #2
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Have you ever thought of getting a dog from a shelter?

If you go to rescues or shelters and tell them what you want/what you can provide-they would be able to let you know if they have a dog that would fit your lifestyle/needs.

Rescues would know more about the dogs in their care(temperament, etc) then shelters-but shelters at least know whether the dog is good with other dogs, people, etc. (Though how a dog behaves in the shelter/rescue/foster and how it behaves in a place it gets use to can be different, they'll get a general idea)

Getting along with other dogs/people-This depends on you. How much socialization *positive* you give the dog. If it has positive socialization with other dogs/people then it would be fine.

(Not completely sure if this is what you were planning on doing-But I'd wait until you move out to get a dog. Most senior dogs cannot handle young dogs, if that is what you're looking into getting)

No breeds are coming to mind right now that match all/most of what you want. But I'll look and post again if I find any I'm sure other members will be able to offer some suggestions! And welcome!

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Old 01-08-2013, 09:52 PM   #3
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Hard to advise on this because I think some of your requirements are contradictory. A young, athletic jogging partner with high trainability and intelligence is probably not going to be ideally suited to being alone all day while you work, and apartment living.

Similarly coat type could be an issue. You have a preference for low grooming (me too!), but I can tell you that the trade off for a shortish coat that doesn't need grooming is that they generally shed like crazy.

It's great that you have identified a need for high sociability towards both humans and other dogs, and recognised that large parties with multiple other dogs in the home is a big ask for a lot of dogs. I would start with a breed / dog that has a natural inclination to 'go nuts and love everybody' because you can easily tone this down with appropriate training. If you start with a dog who has only moderate sociability, you certainly run the risk of the parties and lifestyle causing too much stress and ending up with some reactivity / aggression. Avoid guarding breeds and breeds who are not known for their tolerance of unfamiliar dogs.

General comments - stay away from heavier breeds if your 'jogging' is of a reasonable distance / speed. Larger breed dogs will need to be at least 18 months old before you can start running with them, small dogs probably 12 months.

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Old 01-08-2013, 09:55 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Ama View Post
Have you ever thought of getting a dog from a shelter?

If you go to rescues or shelters and tell them what you want/what you can provide-they would be able to let you know if they have a dog that would fit your lifestyle/needs.

Rescues would know more about the dogs in their care(temperament, etc) then shelters-but shelters at least know whether the dog is good with other dogs, people, etc. (Though how a dog behaves in the shelter/rescue/foster and how it behaves in a place it gets use to can be different, they'll get a general idea)

Getting along with other dogs/people-This depends on you. How much socialization *positive* you give the dog. If it has positive socialization with other dogs/people then it would be fine.

(Not completely sure if this is what you were planning on doing-But I'd wait until you move out to get a dog. Most senior dogs cannot handle young dogs, if that is what you're looking into getting)

No breeds are coming to mind right now that match all/most of what you want. But I'll look and post again if I find any I'm sure other members will be able to offer some suggestions! And welcome!
Thanks for the speedy answer. Shelters are defiantly an option, I just figured if I can get some good ideas on a breed I'd have at least a good starting point to branch off of for looking. And most likely I'd wait until I was out of the house as I'd hate to put banjo through another young dog, Molly already gives him a hard when she feels playful, luckily he's still has enough spunk to play with her when he feels like it or to tell her when enough's enough.

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Old 01-08-2013, 10:07 PM   #5
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Hard to advise on this because I think some of your requirements are contradictory. A young, athletic jogging partner with high trainability and intelligence is probably not going to be ideally suited to being alone all day while you work, and apartment living.

Similarly coat type could be an issue. You have a preference for low grooming (me too!), but I can tell you that the trade off for a shortish coat that doesn't need grooming is that they generally shed like crazy.

It's great that you have identified a need for high sociability towards both humans and other dogs, and recognised that large parties with multiple other dogs in the home is a big ask for a lot of dogs. I would start with a breed / dog that has a natural inclination to 'go nuts and love everybody' because you can easily tone this down with appropriate training. If you start with a dog who has only moderate sociability, you certainly run the risk of the parties and lifestyle causing too much stress and ending up with some reactivity / aggression. Avoid guarding breeds and breeds who are not known for their tolerance of unfamiliar dogs.

General comments - stay away from heavier breeds if your 'jogging' is of a reasonable distance / speed. Larger breed dogs will need to be at least 18 months old before you can start running with them, small dogs probably 12 months.
Ya looking at it from that point of view does make it seem like a big request. But also when I say average shedding usually I think of a lab, which many people would consider a heavy shedder. What I actually think of as a heavy shedder would be something like a husky or the other arctic breeds with thick under coats. I meant to put that when I was typing my description of a dog I'd like but I skipped over it without thinking, my apologies.

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Old 01-08-2013, 10:24 PM   #6
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I would have to agree with Kaos to stay away from the heavier breeds. Your best bet for a jogging partner would probably be a lighter dog, closer towards the 30-40 pound range than the 90 pound range. Another thing to keep in mind with weight is your unknown living arrangements for the future. A lot of apartments and landlords will not allow large dogs (over 20 pounds is usually considered "large", sometimes 30), and those that do often charge through the butt because they're considered a liability and could cause damage to the property on a much larger scale than small dogs. There's also liability when it comes to neighbors in an apartment. A big dog has the potential to inflict more damage if it's aggressive.

I would at least start looking into apartments or rentals now so you know how the real estate management of your city or the city you want to live in handles dogs. In my city, it's not that big of an issue; I could find a place to rent with all three of my dogs, including my 80 pound german shepherd. But I lived in Utah for 6 weeks while my boyfriend took a class at SUU and I took my border collie (30 pounds). Trying to find a pet friendly place to stay was no easy feat.

A small dog might actually be a better option for you long term. It would be horrible to get a dog only to have to give it up because you can't find a place to live with it, or you can't afford such a place. At least with a small dog, you will have more flexibility even with your unknown future living arrangements. The pet fee might not be unreasonable, and you will find more landlords willing to rent to you. Keep in mind too that a small dog can still fit all your requirements. My little mixed breed was a great athletic, hiking dog back in her younger days, friendly and sociable with people and other dogs, intelligent but not so high strung she couldn't be left alone. It's just something to think about

You mentioned you wanted something athletic, intelligent and trainable, and later mentioned a border collie. I kind of assume that a BC is something you may have in mind, though I'd have to say I think a BC may be too much dog for the situation. Remember that a dog doesn't have to be a border collie to be intelligent and trainable. Borders are about as extreme as you can get...They learn things you don't mean to teach them, they learn by watching other dogs, they mimic and try to find shortcuts. It's almost more like having a 3 year old sometimes.

My small mixed breed was eager to please and learned a whole repertoire of tricks, and she picked them up very quickly, under 5 reps for most things. Is she intelligent? Absolutely. But she's not quite as on top of things as the border collie is, and it's that extra problem solving/cognitive awareness and emotional intelligence in the border collie that you probably don't need right now. You can get a dog that you can train easily, that will pick up on things fast without getting one of the top 10 most intelligent breeds
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Old 01-08-2013, 10:38 PM   #7
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I would have to agree with Kaos to stay away from the heavier breeds. Your best bet for a jogging partner would probably be a lighter dog, closer towards the 30-40 pound range than the 90 pound range. Another thing to keep in mind with weight is your unknown living arrangements for the future. A lot of apartments and landlords will not allow large dogs (over 20 pounds is usually considered "large", sometimes 30), and those that do often charge through the butt because they're considered a liability and could cause damage to the property on a much larger scale than small dogs. There's also liability when it comes to neighbors in an apartment. A big dog has the potential to inflict more damage if it's aggressive.

I would at least start looking into apartments or rentals now so you know how the real estate management of your city or the city you want to live in handles dogs. In my city, it's not that big of an issue; I could find a place to rent with all three of my dogs, including my 80 pound german shepherd. But I lived in Utah for 6 weeks while my boyfriend took a class at SUU and I took my border collie (30 pounds). Trying to find a pet friendly place to stay was no easy feat.

A small dog might actually be a better option for you long term. It would be horrible to get a dog only to have to give it up because you can't find a place to live with it, or you can't afford such a place. At least with a small dog, you will have more flexibility even with your unknown future living arrangements. The pet fee might not be unreasonable, and you will find more landlords willing to rent to you. Keep in mind too that a small dog can still fit all your requirements. My little mixed breed was a great athletic, hiking dog back in her younger days, friendly and sociable with people and other dogs, intelligent but not so high strung she couldn't be left alone. It's just something to think about

You mentioned you wanted something athletic, intelligent and trainable, and later mentioned a border collie. I kind of assume that a BC is something you may have in mind, though I'd have to say I think a BC may be too much dog for the situation. Remember that a dog doesn't have to be a border collie to be intelligent and trainable. Borders are about as extreme as you can get...They learn things you don't mean to teach them, they learn by watching other dogs, they mimic and try to find shortcuts. It's almost more like having a 3 year old sometimes.

My small mixed breed was eager to please and learned a whole repertoire of tricks, and she picked them up very quickly, under 5 reps for most things. Is she intelligent? Absolutely. But she's not quite as on top of things as the border collie is, and it's that extra problem solving/cognitive awareness and emotional intelligence in the border collie that you probably don't need right now. You can get a dog that you can train easily, that will pick up on things fast without getting one of the top 10 most intelligent breeds
I personally was am leaning towards a 30-40 pound dog myself even though I am a big dog person at heart. I'm not sure how I even ended up with two small dogs lol. I own to great small dogs and have met some nice small dogs as well but I'd rather not own one myself.

Also border collie was just an example or a poor choice of an apartment dog. I don't think I'd ever be able to keep up with physically or mentally with one lol

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Old 01-09-2013, 07:03 PM   #8
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I would say a small pit mix... I got a 10 month old english staff/boxer mix (guessing), he looks like a pocket size pitbull, approx 40 lbs or less, very agile, smart, dog friendly (and now people friendly after training) most pits are very people friendly by nature though.. Mine was an abuse case.. most pits once exercised properly are awesome couch potatoes.. I go against sugardog and kaos a little, IF you do good daily exercise and training, you can have any dog in an apartment while working. BUT remember this, if you start work at 8.. and you leave house at 7, and you have a young more active dog, then you ned to be up at 4.. exersice the dog to 6 am, get ready between 6 and 7.. I did the first two weeks Scooby was here, and once he got used to that I wore him out, now I can tinkle him in the morning and do exersice after work so I don't have to go up in crack of dawn.. But you need to wear whatever dog you choose out before going to work..

Like I spent 10h in the city with Scooby saturday... Yesterday he was back to his old self.. He slept for 2.5 days basically... I exercise him about 2-3 hours a day, but I wanted an active athletic dog that can hike, camp and run with me.. But due to me working him a lot, he also likes to sleep, so even if he hasn't had a lot of exercise for a couple of days like when I was sick, he adapted to it cause he knows all of a sudden he will be worn out.. They sorta learn to chill cause you wear them out a lot..

BUT, if you get a younger dog, that is intelligent with athletic skill and you aren't willing to do the 2-3 h (that is what you will commit too with what you have described you want when you are off of work so to say) you will shot yourself in the foot..

and Scooby has been home alone up to 12h a couple of times cause of surprise OT, but thanks to wearing him out most of the time, he handles it excellent. My landlords don't even hear a peep from him..
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Old 01-10-2013, 09:37 AM   #9
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I was thinking pit mix, too! or Boxer mix! You'd be able to find that at a shelter and if you want a dog that could run with you, right away, you could get an adult one at the shelter. They are loaded with pit and boxer mixes!

I've known people through the years that had pit mixes in apartments and they did fine as long as they got the exercise they need. They have a lot of energy to spend but are very lovey. Some apartment complexes don't allow them, though. So you would have to research living options, first, just to make sure you could keep him forever.

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Old 01-10-2013, 12:14 PM   #10
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Welcome Brewster! In our area of the country rentals generally requested a weight of 20 lbs or less. Sugardogs' advice of checking out rental requirements is excellent too.
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