DogForum.net | Dog Forums and Community
     
 
Home Gallery Blogs Register Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Calendar Members List
Search
Go Back   DogForum.net | Dog Forums and Community > Dog Discussions > Dog Training

Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools
Unread 05-10-2011, 02:23 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Cassidy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 1,815
Blog Entries: 4

Rep: 55 Cassidy will become famous soon enough
Unique Rep: 20
Default Spinning in Circles

My friend's mom is going to be adopting a puppy mill dog. It is a dachschund that spent its entire life in a cage prior to being rescued. The rescue says that the dog continuously spins in circles and will need a trainer/behaviorist. Has anyone ever had any experience with this? I'm not sure how old the dog is.
__________________


The top 10 reasons to spay/neuter your dog just died in a shelter.

Cassidy is offline Cassidy's Gallery  
Reply With Quote
Unread 05-10-2011, 03:45 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
DeeLind7's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Delaware, USA
Posts: 8,290

Rep: 56 DeeLind7 will become famous soon enough
Unique Rep: 29
Default

Cassidy, my young Collie was a spinner. He is not from a puppy mill. My understanding that dogs do that when they are stressed or bored. Mine did the spinning thing when he was bored to death, like on a rainy day. He will still do it on occastion, but again, only when he hasn't had enough excercise. Any time I saw him do this, I would grab a toy, stop him from spinning, and replace it with some play time. As far as your firends dog, it may be something entirely different. Monkey probably will have some excellent input along with Janice, and vagreys.

DeeLind7 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Unread 05-10-2011, 03:56 PM   #3
Ivy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 1,193

Rep: 17 Ivy is on a distinguished road
Unique Rep: 5
Default

It could be boredom, nervousness or something neurological. Make sure the dog is thoroughly checked by a vet to determine if it's neurological or behavioural.

Ivy is offline  
Reply With Quote
Unread 05-10-2011, 04:26 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 939

Rep: 16 lianne&joe is on a distinguished road
Unique Rep: 3
Default

Can't help with the issue but my Joe spins with excitement in the garden, looks slightly mental as he does it on 3 legs

lianne&joe is offline  
Reply With Quote
Unread 05-10-2011, 07:49 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Kaos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Posts: 4,090

Rep: 258 Kaos is a jewel in the roughKaos is a jewel in the roughKaos is a jewel in the rough
Unique Rep: 66
Default

Quite honestly I am surprised that a rescue would rehome a dog with this type of problem without offering some support from a behaviourist. Hopefully the dog has already had a thorough check by a vet to rule out neurological problems, but as Ivy says, I would want to rule ensure that is the case.

It sounds like the dog has developed an obsessive compulsive or stereotypic behaviour. These are frequently seen in animals without sufficient environmental stimulation - think polar bears pacing at the zoo, or boxed horses weaving from side to side. I think the observation and opinion of a good behaviourist is an excellent plan, and they may even work in with your vet to consider the use of anti-anxiety meds combined with a behaviour modification plan. If the behaviour is not too severe, I would aim to interupt the spinning immediatly it starts and redirect the dog to a more appropriate activity.

Kaos is offline  
Reply With Quote
Unread 05-12-2011, 08:56 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 212

Rep: 11 Maura is on a distinguished road
Unique Rep: 1
Default

Find someone who does canine massage or acupressure. Someone who does reflexology may be able to help as well. This would be in conjunction with distraction and training.
__________________

Maura is offline  
Reply With Quote
Unread 07-07-2011, 03:06 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
FrodoMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 1,136

Rep: 17 FrodoMom is on a distinguished road
Unique Rep: 4
Default

The cattle dog/border collie mix I rescued does the tail chasing thing. Should I be concerned? He also is obsessed with peculiar noises, like for instance he will start running around the house looking for cats when I stir a glass of iced tea. He knows the cats are downstairs and he's not supposed to bother them but he will bark at them and try to find them when he hears certain noises.

FrodoMom is offline FrodoMom's Gallery  
Reply With Quote
Unread 07-07-2011, 08:33 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Kaos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Posts: 4,090

Rep: 258 Kaos is a jewel in the roughKaos is a jewel in the roughKaos is a jewel in the rough
Unique Rep: 66
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by FrodoMom View Post
The cattle dog/border collie mix I rescued does the tail chasing thing. Should I be concerned? He also is obsessed with peculiar noises, like for instance he will start running around the house looking for cats when I stir a glass of iced tea. He knows the cats are downstairs and he's not supposed to bother them but he will bark at them and try to find them when he hears certain noises.
I think the question is how often does he tail chase, for how long, and can he be easily distracted and redirected from the behaviour. Is it something he likes to do sometimes, or is it a compulsive behaviour?

Sounds like he is fairly noise sensitive, when he starts running around in response to your noise, I would simply call him back to you and ask him to 'settle' or 'down' or 'got to mat' or whatever you prefer as a chill out cue. You can then reward the absence of a reaction with long calm strokes or quiet feeding.

Last edited by Kaos; 07-08-2011 at 06:47 AM..

Kaos is offline  
Reply With Quote
Unread 07-08-2011, 06:22 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
CurlySue's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Hampshire, UK
Posts: 2,126

Rep: 42 CurlySue is on a distinguished road
Unique Rep: 18
Default

Just to add, that whilst I have never rescued a dog (I think Nellie needs rescuing from me ), I did once "rescue" a horse with a strangely similar problem.

He was a big lad - full Irish Draft - and had spent 10 of his 16 years shut up in a stable 23 hours a day. When he did get to go outside, it was either in a small dirt yard for an hour, or on a horse walker for an hour (vile contraptions, but no worse than a boring treadmill I suppose ).

He came to me with worn teeth from cribbing in his stable, and an odd variety of wind-sucking, but the oddest manifestation of the poor animal's distress was when I turned him out every day in a lovely big, grassy, sunny field. He would take up a perfect 15 metre circle, at one edge of the field, and endlessly walk around his chosen circle - sometimes for up to 7 hours - until someone went to get him.

Clearly this dacshund is no horse (??) but the point I wanted to make was that with a new and stimulating environment, with slow introduction to what a normal horsey existence SHOULD be, and lots of care and exercise, his circling episodes became shorter and shorter until he stopped altogether.

With the training tips already offered, the little daxy's spinning habit will hopefully die away....perhaps not 100%, depending on how old it is now, but there is hope for all those poor damaged creatures out there when they are introduced to a "normal" lifestyle......
__________________

CurlySue is offline CurlySue's Gallery  
Reply With Quote
Unread 07-08-2011, 10:26 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
FrodoMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 1,136

Rep: 17 FrodoMom is on a distinguished road
Unique Rep: 4
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaos View Post
I think the question is how often does he tail chase, for how long, and can he be easily distracted and redirected from the behaviour. Is it something he likes to do sometimes, or is it a compulsive behaviour?

Sounds like he is fairly noise sensitive, when he starts running around in response to your noise, I would simply call him back to you and ask him to 'settle' or 'down' or 'got to mat' or whatever you prefer as a chill out cue. You can then reward the absence of a reaction with long calm strokes or quiet feeding.

I tried some calming techniques and got Frodo to be calm when I operated the coffee grinder and paper shredder, so it DOES work, but takes a long time and some patience. We haven't achieved calmness with the vacuum cleaner yet, so my house is dirty!

FrodoMom is offline FrodoMom's Gallery  
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:49 AM.

Shogun Interactive Development Copyright 2006-2010 Shogun Interactive Development. All rights reserved.