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Unread 09-23-2006, 07:21 AM   #1
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Thumbs up Clumps of hair coming out

hey evryone i have a 7 year old lab/ whippet cross, he seems to be losing clumps of hair from above his back legs/ around his tail, he does not have bald patches but he has these big tufts of hair that stick out. i have been pulling them of and brushing him regularly, but they just come back in the smame place again, he is in no pain when i remove it though, does anyone have any idea what it could be? he had his back leg amputated last year but as it is on both sides i dont think it is a result of that. if anyone has any advice, id really apprecate it, thankyou!

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Unread 09-23-2006, 09:15 AM   #2
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Ah, Jake went through a losing big clumps of hair stage - which was attributed to stress.

Is it possible for you to post a picture so that we could see the area you are referring to.

I'm sure you'll get lots of good advice on this forum.

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Unread 09-23-2006, 09:27 AM   #3
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hi there, thanks for your reply, it is quite likely that it is stress actually, he was rehomed with me last year not long after his accident and since then i have moved house with him twice, i will post a picture shortly, see if it helps any. thanks again

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Unread 09-23-2006, 09:54 AM   #4
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I do not believe stress would do this to a dog having a pack of 8 shephereds never heard of this.
It may be the dog kibble he is eating also. Try giving him two sardines packed in oil twice a week to replenish oils he needs. Also get him on a good supplement for his skin and coat like Fresh Factors from springtimginc.com as I use and never ever have a skin or coat problem with all of mine and they never have had a bath. Do not bath, it strips the dog of natural oils. If u need further help pm me and I can try to help.
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Unread 09-23-2006, 10:50 AM   #5
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Indeed stress will cause a dog to blow its coat - Jake was diagnosed with stress at Cambridge Veterinary Hospital by Dr Barbara J Skelly MA VetMB PhD CertSAM DACVIM DECVIM MRCVS
Department of Veterinary Medicine
University of Cambridge
Dogs suffer stress just the same as humans and if you look at the stress scale moving home scores very highly. Dogs are creatures of habit and a little anal retentive

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Unread 09-23-2006, 10:50 AM   #6
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I have seen stress do this to one of my dogs an English Mastiff but as Sheplovr said it can also be caused by many different things
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Unread 09-23-2006, 10:52 AM   #7
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Here's the Homes Rahe scale which I use when diagnosing stress in individuals. If you read the article in the New Scientist under another post you will see that dogs do indeed suffer stress.


Death of a Spouse 100 Divorce 73
Marital separation 65 Jail term 65
Death of close family member 63 Personal injury or illness 63
Marriage 50 Fired at work 47
Marriage reconciliation 45 Retirement 45
Change in health of family member 44 Pregnancy 40
Sexual dysfunction 39 Gain of a new family member 44
Business readjustment 38 Change in financial status 38
Death of a close friend 37 Change to different line of work 36
Change in number of arguments with spouse 35 Mortgage over $10,000 31
Foreclosure of mortgage or loan 30 Change in responsibilities at work 29
Son or daughter leaving home 29 Trouble with in-laws 29
Outstanding personal achievement 28 Spouse begins or stops work 26
Begin or end school 26 Change in living conditions 25
Revision of personal habits 24 Trouble with boss 23
Change in work hours or conditions 20 Change in residence 20
Change in schools 20 Change in recreation 20
Change in church activities 19 Change in social activities 19
Mortgage or loan less than $10,000 17 Change in sleeping habits 16
Change in number of family get-togethers 15 Change in eating habits 13
Vacation 13 Christmas 12
Minor violation of the law 11

To find your score, check the events applying to you during the past 12 months. Then add up the total value. Your total score______

Some stress is necessary for life, but too much may be harmful according to the Homes-Rahe scale developed by Dr. Thomas Holmes and Richard H. Rahe at the University of Washington medical school. The scale suggests that a person scoring less than 150 on the scale has only a 50 percent chance of becoming ill during the next two years. A score of 150 and above raises the odds of illness to 90 percent.

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Unread 09-23-2006, 10:56 AM   #8
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Animal Welfare

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I thought some forum members might be interested in an article I read in my New Scientist today. I am sure Becky will find this interesting too.

Animal welfare: See things from their perspective
23 September 2006
NewScientist.com news service
Andy Coghlan

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Your dog falls ill, so you take him to the vet. After a quick consultation you take him home, and soon he appears to be better. But he is not. You and the vet have failed to realise that he is still in severe pain, and the drugs the vet has prescribed will turn him into a social outcast, a dog that may be shunned or even attacked by others.

Such mistakes can happen, say animal behaviour specialists, because our understanding of animal welfare is inadequate, and at times misguided. The human tendency to anthropomorphise means we miss out on animals' real feelings and needs, with the result that we often provide them with inappropriate housing and medical care. This is leading to the health and well being of millions of animals kept as pets, livestock or in zoos being adversely affected.

Last week, researchers gathered at a conference held at the Royal Society in London to hear the latest evidence on how animals interpret the world. One thing is clear: they do not see it the same way we do, and only by accepting that can we learn to care for them better. "The matter of central interest is the animals' own perspective on its quality of life," says James Kirkwood of the Universities Federation for animal Welfare, which co-sponsored the conference with the British Veterinary Association.

The conference comes as pressure for a similar change in attitude builds in the US, where the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research is carrying out the country's first in-depth investigation into stress and distress in laboratory animals. "There's no question, even among researchers, that quality-of-life issues are becoming of more concern," says Bernard Rollin, a philosopher at Colorado State University in Fort Collins and veteran campaigner for improved animal welfare legislation.

Different animals exhibit different behaviours and levels of intelligence, so a set of carefully designed tests is being put together to assess animals' health and welfare. The aim is to allow owners and vets to make objective decisions on how to care for them, free of subjective human assumptions. Many tests, such as those devised in the UK by Lesley Wiseman-Orr, Jacky Reid and colleagues at the University of Glasgow's Institute of Comparative Medicine, rely on a form of psychometric assessment that asks a series of specific questions about an animal's behaviour.

“A set of tests is being put together to assess animals' health and welfare and decide how best to care for them”Wiseman-Orr and Reid have designed a simple one-page questionnaire that can be used to evaluate whether a dog is in pain, an approach they say can be used to objectively evaluate the welfare of any animal in any setting. Their latest test monitors the health and welfare of dogs suffering arthritis. A series of 109 questions covering 13 facets of a dog's appearance, behaviour and habits allow a vet to track the progression of the disease and which treatments are working. The idea is to replace subjective assessments with an objective, repeatable system of logging symptoms.

David Morton of the University of Birmingham, UK, is developing a system to help vets and owners decide whether an animal is suffering so much that it ought to be put down. Its ratings weigh signs of physical distress against positive signs, such as a dog wagging its tail, to give a dispassionate measure of how an animal is faring.

Françoise Wemelsfelder of the Scottish Agricultural College in Edinburgh is looking at a different aspect of welfare: developing a way to assess the suitability of the environment in which animals are kept. She asks observers to watch recordings of groups of animals and then choose adjectives that best describe their physical condition, demeanour and behaviour in a particular environments. These "emotional profile descriptors" are placed on a grid according to how positive or negative the words are. Completed grids show clusters of words which reflect the body language of an animal in that environment.

Over 60 studies on pigs, cattle, sheep and poultry show that "without exception, we've found high levels of agreement between observers, regardless of whether they're vets, farmers or activists," says Wemelsfelder. "Shown videos, they agree what the body language of the animal means."

In the first practical pilot study of the technique, Wemelsfelder asked 11 vets of the UK State Veterinary Service to apply the technique to commercial pig farms. The completed grids show the animals were far less happy crowded into small, indoor penned enclosures. "Before this study, inspectors would simply have rated pigs as 'healthy' or 'unhealthy'," says Wemelsfelder. The new technique reveals much more about how animals react to their circumstances, which will help with the design of better enclosures and encourage animals to be housed in appropriately enriched environments.

It could also help vets find more appropriate ways to treat animals and relieve suffering. For instance, some medical therapies can interfere with how an animal interacts with others, says John Bradshaw of the University of Bristol, UK. Treat a dog with antibiotics, and you risk killing the bacteria that live in its anal sac and produce the individual scent by which it is recognisable to other dogs. "We don't think of dogs losing their identities as a result of medical treatment," he says. Our failure to see life from a dog's perspective means that vets will too freely prescribe antibiotics without considering the consequences for the animal.

“Treat a dog with antibiotics and you risk killing the bacteria that produce the scent by which it is recognisable to other dogs”Sarah Wolfensohn, head of veterinary services at the University of Oxford, is interested in addressing the issue of how animals cumulatively suffer over time, a facet of injury or illness that is often ignored by human carers. She assesses five parameters, such as the clinical status of the animal, and the extent to which the injury hampers its behaviour, and from this calculates an overall score of suffering, which can be repeatedly checked over weeks or months, she told the conference.

Wolfensohn's research, submitted to the journal Animal Welfare, could even be used to help settle some debates over animal rights. In her paper, she describes how her methodology could be used to compare the relative suffering endured by say, a dairy calf, a pet dog, or a primate used in biomedical research.

From issue 2570 of New Scientist magazine, 23 September 2006, page 6-7




It seems like AT LAST someone is listening to the plight of lab animals.

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Unread 09-23-2006, 11:50 AM   #9
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hi again, here as some pictures of my boys coat, he is ginger everywhere except his tummy and nose, but the bits that are coming out are white clumps, dont know if the pictures are so great, hope they hepl, thanks for the replies so far people.
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File Type: jpg P9230055.jpg (67.4 KB, 13 views)
File Type: jpg P9230056.jpg (72.0 KB, 8 views)
File Type: jpg P9230048.jpg (32.7 KB, 9 views)

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Unread 09-23-2006, 10:43 PM   #10
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Welcome Nikaepink....
It just looks like his winter coat coming out early....our lab used to have this after winter. Didn't hurt her any when we pulled it out, just made the house alot more hairy....lol...Husky's get this kind of a coat....anybody else agree?
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