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Unread 04-11-2013, 01:03 PM   #1
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Default I'm thinking of buying a Pomsky

Hello:

First time poster looking to buy his first puppy. I am looking at buying a Pomsky and while not committed to the idea, I am intrigued and was looking to get some feedback and thoughts from those with more experience.

I know this can be a hot topic, so I please ask that people who have an issue with designer dogs and what not to please communicate tactfully. I am not looking to debate that issue nor do I want to get into a pissing match on my first post to these forums.

Like I said, I am thinking of getting a Pomsky but am not sure if it is the right path for me. Frankly, I have a lot of questions and most of the sources on the internet about Pomskies are garbage. I have been reading an active website called PomskyHQ the last couple of days and wanted to get independent information from you guys.

I am primarily looking for someone to communicate in an intelligent fashion (not an emotional one) what they consider the downside or risks of crossing a pomeranian with a siberian husky. I am also looking for someone to give me independent assessments of what they think I may need to expect with respect to the behavior/temperament and challenges of owning this mixed breed.

Thank you in advance for the civil discourse and constructive feedback.

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Unread 04-11-2013, 03:22 PM   #2
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I think there would be a lot of health issues with breeding a big dog like a Husky to a Toy dog like a Pom. If you are interested in the look of the dog why not look into the Alaskan Klee Kai as they have at least been responsibly bred.

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Unread 04-11-2013, 04:18 PM   #3
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A 'pomsky' is a mixed breed-with mixed breeds every aspect for them is unpredictable(temperament, health, size, etc)-with mixed breeds there's no way to tell what the outcome will be in temperament, behavior or health.

With the 'pomsky' it is a mix of breeds that are completely opposite of each other-not only in size but also in energy level and pretty much everything else.

People who breed designer breeds are doing it for money, they don't care about genetic health issues or temperament. If you are set on getting a mixed breed-look in shelters or rescues. Personally, The only time I'd buy a mixed breed from a breeder is if they were mix breeding for working purposes.

You can look into dog breeds that look like what you want and see if they match your lifestyle-good luck on finding the right dog for you

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Unread 04-11-2013, 05:24 PM   #4
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FirstPuppySeeker, welcome to the Forum! I believe health and temperament should be number one, no matter what the breed. Purchasing any dog from any breeder, requires a lot of research on the buyer. Lots of questions need to be asked. Do either parents have health issues? Does the puppy come with a guarantee? There is a whole list of questions you'll want to know. As Ama has said, with designer dogs, as they are called, you really do not know that you're going to get, or what kind of health issues you could expect. You may want to research each breed separately. Examine the qualities of both dogs, and see if they are going to match your life style. Good luck!
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Unread 04-11-2013, 06:41 PM   #5
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You haven't found much on "Pomskys" because they are not a breed. They are a Pomeranian/Husky... a mutt.
I second the Alaskan Klee Kai suggestion although they are NOT the breed for everyone. They can be quite nervous/high strung and tend to be difficult to socialize (meaning that they require LOTS of it).
Why are you looking for this particular mix? Just appearance? Look into rescuing...

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Unread 04-11-2013, 08:52 PM   #6
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Honestly, I would bet there is a purebred dog out there that has exactly the kind of temperament and size that you are desiring that's leading you to a mix

There are actually several risks and downsides to getting these designer breeds. One is that they aren't really breeds, and they aren't really being "formed" into a breed with any degree of consistency. The breeds that we have today were formed for a very specific purpose...There was a very high degree of selection. Not every dog was allowed to breed; in fact, a lot of dogs were actually killed if they didn't exhibit desirable behaviors or structure. For example, great pyrenese. When the breed was still in the developing phase, any dog that killed sheep was probably shot. People didn't want that. They wanted a placid dog with no prey drive that would bond to sheep and guard them. When adding a new breed to a developing breed, the dogs used were also carefully selected. Breeds did not form willy nilly.

Our designer breeds, on the other hand, are formed willy nilly. There's no purpose, no structure, very little selection. This can result in a high degree of variability. If I got a "pomsky" here in California, and you got one where ever you are at, it's very possible that they will act like two entirely different breeds of dog. It won't be like a well bred purebred, where I have a border collie and he's got a similar temperament and structure and drive as my friend's border collie in Colorado. There's a lot of history and selection in the border collie breed that has lead them to be so consistent. If I get another border collie, I have a good idea of what it'll be like. If I had a pomsky and got another, I could get something entirely different.

Because there's no real purpose to crossing huskies and pomeranians, and they're not being developed into a proper breed, the only real reason people breed them is for "fun", or to make money because they have a dog they can label with a catchy name. Most breeders of these mixes are not checking for the health problems that are common in the breeds. This cuts down on costs and yields a higher profit, and you pay a lot of money for a dog that may end up with health problems.

I'll compare the difference between the price for a well bred purebred, and a designer breed, and the quality of dog I get.

The border collie breeders I'm looking at now health test the parents. X-rays are done and the dogs are OFA certified good or excellent for hips, which means no hip displaysia. The parents' eyes are checked for CEA, or Collie Eye Anamoly, a genetic disease that commonly occurs in collies. The puppies are tested for this too before they go home. They are BAER tested, which is a hearing test. The parents are all either working or performance bred, which means they have good drive and herding ability; they have the temperament a border collie should have. Dogs that are fearful or aggressive aren't bred.

The puppies are raised with an early neural stimulation program. In other words, the breeders spends hours with these puppies, exposing them to EVERYTHING. They have CD tracts that play gunshots and fireworks and thunderstorms. They have puppy play rooms where the dogs get exposed to toys that move and bounce and make noise, equipment that moves like a wobbleboard, things to climb on and go under. The puppies are raised being touched all over, played with and held different ways. They get balloons and bells tied to their collars. Their paws are tickled and their little claws maintained with a grinder from day one. They are even started on basic potty training. The pups get their first shots before they go home and get wormed.

All this, and one breeder I'm looking at charges $1500. It seems like a lot, but look at what she does. Look at the care and training and socialization she is providing MY puppy before I even get it. There is NO WAY she makes a profit doing that. She's got a home training business that supports this hobby and passion. $1500 for a happy, guaranteed healthy, well adjusted, bombproof puppy almost doesn't seem enough for the hours she spends raising them. And if I get that puppy, I already have a good idea of what it will be like. I will know that if I get a puppy from one of the two breeders I'm looking at, I will have a driven, intelligent dog that I can do flyball or agility with.

OR, I could buy a designer puppy. I've seen labradoodles and chorkies sell for $1000, sometimes even as much as $1500, same price as the border collie pups. For $1000 for a labradoodle, I have a puppy that hasn't likely been tested for health issues. The pup is may grow up to have hip displaysia because it's a common issue with laboradors. I won't be sure whether it'll act like a poodle, or like a lab. It won't be raised with same level of socialization as a puppy raised with an early neural stimulation program. If I'm lucky, I'll find a breeder that raised the dogs in their house, so it's familiar with that environment and the noises that occur in a house. Maybe the kids even played with the puppies a lot, great! If I'm unlucky, I'll get a dog that was raised in a kennel and the breeders maybe spent a couple hours with a day. The puppy may come with it's first shots and dewormed, but maybe not. The puppy wont' come with any kind of health guarantees.

So $1500 for a well bred border collie where the money I pay actually goes into raising and socializing and caring for my puppy after it's born and testing parents, and I know exactly what I'm getting....Or the same price for a labradoodle so that the majority of it can just be pocked by the breeder for profit, and I'll have a dog that may end up with health problems, temperament issues, or may not have the temperament I expected.

To me, the decision seems obvious. If I wanted to take a risk and get a dog that may end up being a project dog, or a walking health disaster, the heck with just handing somebody $1500. I'll get a dog from the shelter for $100 and spend the rest of that $1500 trying to fix it!

If you can actually FIND a breeder who has some structure to how they breed a designer breed, and actually does health tests and raises the pups right and takes responsibility for them by screening buyers and using contracts, I would say go for it. But most designer dog breeders? They don't care...They're just trying to rip you off.
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Unread 04-11-2013, 09:19 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sugardog;394532[I
]"To me, the decision seems obvious. If I wanted to take a risk and get a dog that may end up being a project dog, or a walking health disaster, the heck with just handing somebody $1500 I'll get a dog from the shelter for $100 and spend the rest of that $1500 trying to fix it!

If you can actually FIND a breeder who has some structure to how they breed a designer breed, and actually does health tests and raises the pups right and takes responsibility for them by screening buyers and using contracts, I would say go for it. But most designer dog breeders? They don't care...They're just trying to rip you off[/I].
I find these rather offensive comments as well as misinformed. Purebred dogs, both those from reputable breeders and those from less interested in maintaining a breed standard are as rife with health issues as are mixes...if not moreso. "Top notch" golden retriever breeders still produce dogs that have a cancer rate of upwards of 60 percent, owners of boxers, rottweilers and many other breeders of purebred dogs face similar odds. Mitral valve disease and syringomyelia are widespread in the cavalier king charles spaniel. HD and CEA are the most prevalent disorders in border collies. And the list goes on.

"Defects include a higher risk of cancer and tumors; eye and heart disease; joint and bone disorders; skin, immune system and neurological diseases; and even epilepsy. There is no need to panic, though. You just need to be aware of the risk of defects in your prospective new purebred puppy, a risk that is much higher than in a mix-breed puppy.

While quality breeders do test prospective parent dogs for defective genes -- and avoid breeding them if there are defects -- the broad problem of defects continues to grow as current breeding practices narrow the gene pool ever further."

Problems Common to Purebred Dogs | petMD
The Truth About Purebred Dogs

Having been down the ownership road of both purebred and mixed breed dogs, I would suggest you set aside that $1500 to prepare for the health needs of any dog you happen to own.
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Unread 04-11-2013, 10:40 PM   #8
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I agree with you totally JGLI.
I have had mutts and I have had pure breds from reputable breeders. My mutts have always outlasted my pure breds by a land slide with much less health issues.
Not saying this is always the case but I am saying it has always been the case for me.
Not to demean or minimize the reputable breeders out there but rescues are generally amazing pets for an every day pet owner. They aren't necessarily a walking vet bill as Sugardog implied, nor are well bred purebreds always "bomb proof".
I would never spend $1500 (initial purchase price) on ANY dog. Too many amazing dog for free or for a small rescue fee.

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Unread 04-11-2013, 11:35 PM   #9
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I must not have worded myself right.

I wasn't trying to say that mutts are unhealthy while purebreds are the picture of health.

What I was trying to say is that if you're going to spend a good chunk of money on a dog, try to ensure that you know what you are getting. Buy from a reputable breeder because it's not ONLY about the health testing, but also about purpose, structure, and the way your puppy is being socialized and treated before you get it. Think of the money you spend on a dog as the way you pay and reimburse somebody for taking care of your puppy while it was still too young to be with you.

I will NOT spend hundreds or thousands of dollars on a mixed breed or designer dog. Not JUST because they don't health test, but because they don't breed for purpose, and the quality of care and socialization isn't the same. Compared to the BC breeders I have my eye on, most designer dog breeders haven't earned the money they charge. They do the bare minimum to produce puppies and ask for the maximum amount of money for it.

Or, compare it to the dogs bred to be service dogs. They often are labs mixed with goldens. But they are purposeful, receive top notch care, socialization, and health testing. That is worth paying for, especially if you or somebody you love needs it. Some people breed staffies and border collies to create performance dogs in flyball. Again, we have purpose, there is health testing, and the puppies receive top notch care and the breeders stay responsible for the puppies they produce.

If you get a mixed breed or designer dog from a BYB, you are getting a dog with a questionable background and you won't know exactly how it'll turn out. It may end up dog aggressive, nervous/anxious, it may end up with health problems, it may not, it may have a high prey drive or herding instinct, it may not. It's a bit of a gamble! If you are willing to do that, to get a dog not knowing exactly how it will turn out and willing to take what you get, why support a designer dog breeder and spend $1000, when you can rescue a dog instead? The reason I want border collies from a reputable performance/working breeder is to ensure I actually get a border collie because the breed has specific traits that I like and desire. I want to compete, so I don't want a high risk of getting a dog prone to injuries because of poor structure, or that may have dog aggression or fear.

I'm happy to spend the $1500 on a well bred performance border collie. I'd be happy to spend a good sum on a well-bred staffie/BC if I was really flyball. I'd be happy to spend MORE than that amount on a lab/golden service dog if somebody I loved needed that dog. But I will not spend $1500 on a designer breed or an accidental mixed breed with a special name and support the people responsible for it.
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Unread 04-12-2013, 12:32 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by Sugardog View Post
I must not have worded myself right.

I wasn't trying to say that mutts are unhealthy while purebreds are the picture of health.

What I was trying to say is that if you're going to spend a good chunk of money on a dog, try to ensure that you know what you are getting. Buy from a reputable breeder because it's not ONLY about the health testing, but also about purpose, structure, and the way your puppy is being socialized and treated before you get it. Think of the money you spend on a dog as the way you pay and reimburse somebody for taking care of your puppy while it was still too young to be with you.

I will NOT spend hundreds or thousands of dollars on a mixed breed or designer dog. Not JUST because they don't health test, but because they don't breed for purpose, and the quality of care and socialization isn't the same. Compared to the BC breeders I have my eye on, most designer dog breeders haven't earned the money they charge. They do the bare minimum to produce puppies and ask for the maximum amount of money for it.

Or, compare it to the dogs bred to be service dogs. They often are labs mixed with goldens. But they are purposeful, receive top notch care, socialization, and health testing. That is worth paying for, especially if you or somebody you love needs it. Some people breed staffies and border collies to create performance dogs in flyball. Again, we have purpose, there is health testing, and the puppies receive top notch care and the breeders stay responsible for the puppies they produce.

If you get a mixed breed or designer dog from a BYB, you are getting a dog with a questionable background and you won't know exactly how it'll turn out. It may end up dog aggressive, nervous/anxious, it may end up with health problems, it may not, it may have a high prey drive or herding instinct, it may not. It's a bit of a gamble! If you are willing to do that, to get a dog not knowing exactly how it will turn out and willing to take what you get, why support a designer dog breeder and spend $1000, when you can rescue a dog instead? The reason I want border collies from a reputable performance/working breeder is to ensure I actually get a border collie because the breed has specific traits that I like and desire. I want to compete, so I don't want a high risk of getting a dog prone to injuries because of poor structure, or that may have dog aggression or fear.

I'm happy to spend the $1500 on a well bred performance border collie. I'd be happy to spend a good sum on a well-bred staffie/BC if I was really flyball. I'd be happy to spend MORE than that amount on a lab/golden service dog if somebody I loved needed that dog. But I will not spend $1500 on a designer breed or an accidental mixed breed with a special name and support the people responsible for it.
Though I still get your point I must say that whether they are pure bred or mutt, they may/may not be any more/less bomb proof.
You can get a Border Collie from this breeder and it may be perfect. Or maybe it will not do the job you intended for it to do. You just DONT KNOW unless you are purchasing an adult dog.
Health can also be a toss up. You can test out the wazoo but every dog is unique and you can't tell 100%.
I do not support byb's but I have seen some (that would be considered hobby breeders/byb's on a small scale) produce animals that have longetivity/health/and purpose. How did they do this with no tests whatsoever?
Sometimes it's just dumb luck.
You could spend $1500 on a dog that refuses to do the job you intend, may come down with serious illnesses, may have serious temperament issues. You honestly cannot guarantee it.
I bought a purebred puppy that was health tested, temperament tested, registered from champion parents that: when I got him home, he attacked my face in a very aggressive manner and drew blood (I know the difference between aggression and puppy play). Why? No reason.
There are literally no guarantees.
That dog went back to the breeder.

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