DogForum.net | Dog Forums and Community
     
 
Home Gallery Register Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Calendar Members List
Search
Go Back   DogForum.net | Dog Forums and Community > Dog Discussions > Dog General Discussion

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 02-05-2012, 01:52 PM   #31
Forum Director
 
JGLI's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 10,458

Rep: 96 JGLI will become famous soon enough
Unique Rep: 50
Default

Out of respect to the OP, please keep the thread on topic. Should there be interest in types of harnesses, car restraints, etc. please start another thread.
__________________
Help us Help you! Read and understand the Terms of Service, report offensive posts and Forum Reputation.
Helpful Tips - in our FAQ Section and Newbie Guide.
Connect with DogForum.org members - Add yourself to the dogforum.net member map.chat with us!
Things to do - Start a blog. Be sure to visit the DogForum.net photo gallery Let's see YOU!
Use your computer to benefit mankind - join the DogForum.org Folding Team.

JGLI is offline JGLI's Gallery  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2012, 03:05 PM   #32
Adopt a Retired Racer
 
vagreys's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: North Chesterfield VA USA
Posts: 3,524

Rep: 187 vagreys has a spectacular aura aboutvagreys has a spectacular aura about
Unique Rep: 70
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by gaseousclay View Post
are any of you over-protective with your dog? I'm not passing judgement on anyone that is, just curious why some dog owners are this way. I ask because I do occasionally meet individuals who are incredibly protective of their dog to the point where they might as well keep them confined at home. I actually find it a little disheartening because all dogs need to socialize and I think it's important for dog owners to learn and understand dog behavior. I know there are cases where a dog might be better off alone, especially if he/she has a history of aggressive behavior, but I do think interaction with dogs is a positive thing...
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeeLind7 View Post
I've seen people who are over protective of their dogs. I'm not quite sure what they are afraid of, but I too, wonder why they even bother going on walks...
Quote:
Originally Posted by JGLI View Post
I think it is important to keep an open mind and try to withhold assumptions about how people act with their dog in public as there could very likely be sound reasons for how they handle them...
Quote:
Originally Posted by gaseousclay View Post
Yeah, my comment was geared more at those who seemingly have no real issues with their dog...
Ah. Geared to those who seemingly have no real issues with their dog. I see. I don't have any real issues with my dog. I know my dog. I know my dog's subset of the breed. I know the breed. I know dog behavior. I know the importance of socialization. The purpose of taking my dog for a walk or to the park is exercise and the chance to get outside, not to expose it to oblivions (and no, this is not directed at anyone on the forum) who assume that every dog will like theirs and want to play, and that it is quite OK to allow their unleashed dog to run up to mine without permission (and often despite multiple warnings), or to let their retractable-leashed dog entangle my dog. There is a reason my dog is on a short lead and may be wearing a Greyhound's nylon kennel muzzle.

What you deem overprotective may well be a complete misjudement of the situation on your part, and the conclusions you draw about me and my motives, completely wrong. The dog I'm protecting is yours, because you may not be protecting your own from a danger you aren't aware of and can't foresee, precisely because I DO know my dog. You assume that I'm worried about my dog, but I'm not - I'm worried about yours.

My dog was trained from early puppyhood in order to hone specific instincts in its breed. I know that my dog responds to certain visual cues and that this breed is capable of chasing and killing animals ranging from rabbits to coyote and deer. I know that my dog, in particular, was trained as a racing Greyhound to chase and catch (if possible) a fluffy, fast-moving object, with concentration so complete that it will ignore cars, fences, other dogs, other threats and its own exhaustion in its effort to catch and kill the object that has caught its attention. I know that my dog responds more strongly to certain breeds, and that West Highland Terriers, Schipperke, Chihuahuas, Toy or Miniature Poodles, Shih Tzu, Pomeranians, Lhasa Apso, Pekingese, and dogs with flag tails, like some retrievers, are at particular risk. Also, any dog up to throat height that approaches my dog's throat is at risk, because my dog is tall and his throat is exposed and he is protective of it. My dog will stand still for another dog to check him out, but if that dog wraps its leash a round my dog's legs, or lingers too long near the tail, or is allowed to make the extremely foolish gesture of mounting, my dog may explode into a whirlwind of action. Even muzzled, my dog may be capable of killing yours, because one of the breed's hunting behaviors is to use its long forelegs to break the back of its prey.

What you judge OVER-protective, I consider prudent and responsible ownership. That's why I move my dog to the other side of the street. That's why I warn you not to let your dog approach mine, or to approach with care. That's why, if I don't like your dog's langauge and signalling, I'll refuse to let your dog meet mine. That's why I only go to the dogpark when it is empty or scheduled for a meet and greet of other dogs of the same breed and training. That's why I turn around and walk my dog another direction if you are walking your Westie toward a meeting with destiny. That's why I will place myself between my dog and your off-leash, intact, obnoxious, male, miniature poodle with a Napoleon complex, and do my best to scare it away because you refuse to control your dog.

My dog behaves very well on lead. He looks gentle and sweet, because he is. He follows commands (some better than others), and in general is a very well-behaved dog, unless provoked. I try very hard to avoid situations that might provoke instinctive response, or years of training I can't undo. You have no way of knowing that, at a distance, or without knowing me and my dog, personally.
__________________
Help us Help you! Read and understand the Terms of Service, report offensive posts and Forum Reputation.
Helpful Tips - in our FAQ Section and Newbie Guide.
Connect with DogForum.org members - Add yourself to the dogforum.net member map.chat with us!
Things to do - Start a blog. Be sure to visit the DogForum.net photo gallery Let's see YOU!
Use your computer to benefit mankind - join the DogForum.org Folding Team.

vagreys is offline vagreys's Gallery  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2012, 03:17 PM   #33
Senior Member
 
CurlySue's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Hampshire, UK
Posts: 2,172

Rep: 42 CurlySue is on a distinguished road
Unique Rep: 18
Default

Well....all I can say is Amen.

My favourite quote is;

Quote:
Originally Posted by vagreys View Post
That's why I move my dog to the other side of the street. That's why I warn you not to let your dog approach mine, or to approach with care. That's why I turn around and walk my dog another direction if you are walking your Westie toward a meeting with destiny.
So true. Incidentally, I take particular care with greyhounds, having seen my mother-in-laws Patterdale terrier dangling from the jaws of one a few years back.

Interestingly, the other day I was walking Nellie in her hazard-striped lead, when a lady and a child came onto the field with an off-lead greyhound. I consciously started looking for escape routes, but to my joy and relief, she took one look at my small black dog and her hazard warning stripes, called her dog back and put it on a lead. Hurrah!!!

CurlySue is offline CurlySue's Gallery  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2012, 05:09 PM   #34
Senior Member
 
FrodoMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 1,362

Rep: 18 FrodoMom is on a distinguished road
Unique Rep: 4
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by whataboutpuppy View Post
Lol... I'm CPST (Child Passenger Safety Technician). So I'm sure we've had much of the same scenario training. What kind of harness do you use? I'd had the PetBuckle but I just was never pleased... She now uses a Bergan Harness and I love it... but I'm always open to another option! lol

That's what we have. It seemed easy to put on, although Frodo is harder to "dress" than a newborn baby when he's excited
The carabiner clip is fastened to a permanent part of the metal frame under the back seat. I found myself reaching out to steady him around curves or quick stops before we had this. I was sad about an article about someone having a car accident and their dog turned up missing. I have put an enormous amount of time and money into training this dog, and besides, I love him, so it seemed necessary to buckle him in.
__________________
Not all who wander are lost.

FrodoMom is offline FrodoMom's Gallery  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2012, 06:30 AM   #35
Senior Member
 
Melamaphine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Coventry, UK
Posts: 4,929

Rep: 66 Melamaphine will become famous soon enough
Unique Rep: 30
Default

Not all dogs want to meet other dogs. There are many reasons for this, it can be that they are frail, old, sick, frightened, aggressive.

I am all for dogs socialising IF that is what is right for BOTH dogs involved.

It is well worth reading up on the DINOS (Dogs In Need Of Space) campaign - it makes a lot of sense.

My Dog is Friendly! A Public Service Announcement | notes from a dog walker

My dogs are friendly, but they are not allowed to rush at other dogs, in turn they don't appreciate being bounced on. If your dog is the type to bounce on and try and play with every dog it meets, it is NOT well socialised.

Well socialised dogs read the other dog's signals and react appropriately. The playmonsters tend to ignore any visual cues that a dog is telling them 'no thanks' and try and play anyway, this can cause aggro.

My dogs occasionally play with other dogs on walks, but it's only when the dog mirrors their body language politely and appropriately - and both myself and the other dog's owners are happy about it.

As for small dogs. We have small dogs in my family, miniature daxis. One has had a spinal injury that he has only just regained some movement in his hindquarters from and it could paralyse him if he was bounced on, so yep, we sure as hell protect him from other dogs bounding over. It's not that we're worried about larger dogs - I have larger dogs that are fine with the little ones! Don't assume that someone is being overprotective for no reason....

I for one am thankful we do not have 'dog parks' here they sound nightmareish, I am sure both my dogs would hate that kind of forced socialisation. We fortunately manage to do most of our offlead walks in woodlands and rarely meet other dogs, the ones we have met are in general polite.
__________________


I'am chillin' with forum thanks Bigboy and Sheplovr!

I've been fleeced by Draco!

Last edited by Melamaphine; 02-06-2012 at 06:35 AM..

Melamaphine is offline Melamaphine's Gallery  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2012, 10:25 AM   #36
Senior Member
 
Kenzie'sMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Near North Ontario
Posts: 1,030

Rep: 35 Kenzie'sMom is on a distinguished road
Unique Rep: 11
Default

Mel, that's an extraordinarily well written article (and written with a sense of humour as well)!!

Makes me almost wish I did Farcebook so I could do a 'like'...

Should be mandatory reading for all dog owners IMO! Course the ones here in town that need it the most would be the least likely to actually read it anyways!

Kenzie'sMom is offline Kenzie'sMom's Gallery  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2012, 10:40 AM   #37
Senior Member
 
Melamaphine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Coventry, UK
Posts: 4,929

Rep: 66 Melamaphine will become famous soon enough
Unique Rep: 30
Default

It is a good article isn't it, it explains very well what the problem is.

I do wish it was mandatory reading for every dog owner!
__________________


I'am chillin' with forum thanks Bigboy and Sheplovr!

I've been fleeced by Draco!

Melamaphine is offline Melamaphine's Gallery  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2012, 06:24 PM   #38
Senior Member
 
moose13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 227

Rep: 11 moose13 is on a distinguished road
Unique Rep: 1
Default

I know what you are saying OP.
Some people won't let their dogs be dogs.

moose13 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2012, 04:51 AM   #39
Senior Member
 
DasTwerp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: UK
Posts: 574

Rep: 17 DasTwerp is on a distinguished road
Unique Rep: 6
Default

i dont consider myself over protective of blake at all. but in all fairness i do NOT like dogs just running towards us off leash. and i do NOT like the assumption of dogs have to play all the time
Quote:
our dog immediately started chasing each other and wrestling
if a dog approached blake like this on lead it would not go well, as blake has issues while on lead. he has been to classes and properly socialised. he does play nice with dogs of lead, and he does wrestle and run and chase.
But to be honest I choose when where and with what dog.
Same way i would not let my kids run riot in a restaurant assuming that everyone will like to be bothered by them.
I think its common curtsey to step aside and make blake lie down when bicycles or runners come along, same way i think it should be common curtsey to ask another dog owner if it is ok to let the dogs meet.
there is a time and place for everything, and a dog park should not be an excuse to let your dog randomly bother other dogs
__________________
Some days you're the dog, some days you're the hydrant.
-unknown origins-

DasTwerp is offline DasTwerp's Gallery  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2012, 11:24 AM   #40
Senior Member
 
gaseousclay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 368

Rep: 12 gaseousclay is on a distinguished road
Unique Rep: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DasTwerp View Post
there is a time and place for everything, and a dog park should not be an excuse to let your dog randomly bother other dogs
it's not really an excuse imo. a dog park is precisely that, it's a park for dogs. you're also assuming that all dog owners have complete control over their dogs, which isn't the case. when I bring my dog to the park it's for several reasons - a) so he can get exercise and b) so he can socialize with other animals. he's going to want to run and play with other dogs and it seems odd to leash him in a park specifically meant for play. my feeling is that if you're at a dog park and you don't want other dogs bothering your dog then maybe bringing your dog to the park isn't the best idea.

I guess I compare dog ownership to being a parent and having kids. Yes, you can shelter your child and try to shield them from all the bad things in life, but I don't think this does them any good in the end. You might as well make your child stay at home and wear a helmet their whole life. a bird's gotta learn how to fly in order to leave the nest

gaseousclay is offline gaseousclay's Gallery  
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:05 PM.

Shogun Interactive Development Copyright 2006-2015 Shogun Interactive Development. All rights reserved.