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View Poll Results: Pitbulls in doggie day care?
yes 7 46.67%
no 2 13.33%
other /more complicated 6 40.00%
Voters: 15. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-07-2012, 05:46 PM   #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by agilityk9trainer View Post
A trainer I had years ago was telling me about the only time she got bit. It was a German Shepherd who gave her a warning before it bit (it squinted it's eyes), which she chose to ignore. It turned on her and grabbed her forearm, and it "locked on" - or really just wouldn't let go. She said she stood still and gently talked to the dog till it came back into it's mind, so to speak, and let her go.

She told me that when some dogs attack, they go into a part of their brain where they just do not respond to commands. It's like they can't hear. I see this all the time in agility dogs. We call it reaching "agility mass." It's where the dog has reached a state of excitement (be it aggressive or just drive) where it is unable to respond to commands anymore. You have to wait it out till it calms down and can again respond.

I think this is where the "lock jaw" myth comes from. And it's obviously not just pits that will get into a part of their brain from over excitement where they just stall. If that's in mid bite, then that's where they will stay until they can reenter the part of their brain where they can again respond to their environment.

My trainer said if she had reacted emotionally and pulled her arm back, it would have ripped the skin off of her arm. Yikes!

I remember Aslan entering "agility mass" once. We were at a trial, and he jumped up on the pause table. He was supposed to down, but he had entered "agility mass" and wasn't responding to commands. His eyes were literally bouncing back and forth rapidly and at different angles. He just wasn't home. It was one of the oddest things I've seen a dog do, but it is not uncommon in high drive dogs. After a few moments, he eyes refocused and we were able to continue.
My dog has done that at agility trials!!!! She isn't aggressive but gets so amped up she can't hear me and won't give a startline stay at all. It's what I'm working on with her now, learning to be more relaxed. Thanks for a term to use for it "Agility Mass", OMG that is certainly Layla!

She can get that way over tennis balls too if I am present, which is why we can't go to our local dog parks anymore, she got snarky over a tennis ball on the ground with a Lab that went into attack mode. Not good. Fortunately Layla wasn't hurt.

Layla does very well at her doggie daycare. She does not go into any kind of high drive zone without me there. Our doggie daycare is small and well-run. The do temperment testing prior to letting dogs come there, which is why we choose them after our dog park problems.

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Old 12-08-2012, 04:55 PM   #52
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Yes, "agility mass" exists. My newer sheltie reaches agility mass often, but as they age and become more mature, they learn how to handle that excessive excitement and drive. Layla will get that under control soon. Congrats on doing agility with her!!!
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Old 12-08-2012, 07:16 PM   #53
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I work in a Doggy Day Care, and we allow them. At some places, they are not allowed and often refused. I've NEVER had a problem with any of the pitbulls that come to work and we have quite a few. 2 of them I don't think I've ever seen even play growl. One of them came in recently with his tail broken, I asked the owner what happened and she said he was wagging his tail to hard against the wall and broke it! He is such a happy happy dog.

The idea that certain dogs are banned from daycares baffles me. The worst dogs we have are the smaller ones and a few psychotic labs. It should be on a dog-to-dog basis always and never should a dog be turned away because it's "breed" is known to be aggressive. I love all the pitties that come into work and honestly, I don't think we've ever had a fight involving any of them.
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Old 12-10-2012, 02:38 PM   #54
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Thanks, I have gotten the book "Control Unleashed", which was recommended by both a Border Collie message board, when I posted about my difficulties, and a friend who has a lot of experience doing Agility successfully with Fox and Rat Terriers. So far it is helping me understand my girl much better and is improving how I am working with her. It got really frustrating to have her go to an agility trial and Q in 4 runs then go to another and either blow off the entire run and whirle around like a crazy dog or just blow the beginning and settle into following me perfectly once it was too late. My frustration only made matters much, much worse also. We have been feeding each other.

The thing I am gradually learning is that I can't apply people logic to my dog. And I need to understand what makes her tick, and a big part of that is what has been bred into her which are her herding instincts and the desire to work with her human. She is a BC Mix, but we strongly suspect there is a decent amount of Blue Heeler in there too; so she herds and chases, but is only extreme with that when I am around and to a lesser degree my husband. I suspect this would apply to behaviors that have been bred into any dog. So someone who had no desire to work within the bounds of Layla's natural drives would be disappointed in her as a companion (we ADORE her). I would imagine that is the same with Pit Bulls, if someone doesn't know or acknowledge what their dog's ancestors were bred for then if those tendencies show up in some way it could prove difficult. That being said I've met a LOT of really sweet Pit Bulls and have met a few Labs that were lacking in social graces (which goes against popular beliefs).

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