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Old 03-06-2013, 06:05 PM   #41
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Otis is a large dog - he's only 6 months and is already taller and longer than my adult lab. We did start crate training in the beginning, starting offf in incriments and it seemed to work, now that I think about it, when he did hurt his toe it was the first time he experienced my husband travelling and DUcky was keeping him company, but then after a while she would leave the room he was in. The longest he would be crated for is 3 hours. I am a stay at home Mom so I am around a lot and we don't like to leave them long anyway because they are used to us being around.

I just tried putting him in while I was home and the first time he lasted 5 minutes no fuss.. I am going to take him for a walk soon, then try for 10 after he eats dinner. Hopefully it works. The crate we have is large enough for him, he can stand up easy, turn around etc.

I am hoping that he grows out of the destructive stage and we will work on that behaviour when we are home with him. He has ruined some hand me down antique furnature, my futon, pillows, a chair etc. He has plenty of toys and things to chew on and Ducky here to keep him company. Anyway, I am hoping he won't always go in a crate.. In my many years of having dogs this is the first crate I have had in my house.

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Old 03-06-2013, 06:33 PM   #42
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Have you ever had a dog that needed to be strictly confined due to illness or surgery? or a dog that has had to spend extended time at the vet? or has had to travel by car or be transported? or needed to be kept contained safely because of structural or environmental issues in the house? Crate training is much more about ensuring the safety and comfort of the dog than you realize.
Yes When Nipper was spayed. And yes I realise some times a crate can be use full but I still think some people do over do it! What I do have a problem with is when a dog has behavioural problems sometimes owners just crate thinking the problems will go away For vets visits and travelling on long car journeys it's a great idea I am not the only member on here that's never crated either!
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Old 03-06-2013, 06:52 PM   #43
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Yes When Nipper was spayed. And yes I realise some times a crate can be use full but I still think some people do over do it! What I do have a problem with is when a dog has behavioural problems sometimes owners just crate thinking the problems will go away For vets visits and travelling on long car journeys it's a great idea I am not the only member on here that's never crated either!
Of course, people overdo. This is why it is important to provide them with the information to correctly train and properly use the crate. You are providing them with an invaluable tool for the comfort, safety, and management of their dog while taking advantage of a dog's natural inclination for using a den. The benefits go far beyond car travel and vet stays, though think for a minute about how much less the stress level is for a dog in such a situation when it has previously had crate training and now sees its crate as a place of security and refuge instead of having it thrust upon them in an already uncomfortable situation. Crate training can greatly assist with housetraining and behavioral training:

"The crate is a place for the dog to be when no one is around to supervise him. It is the dog's bed and sanctuary. Its purpose is to provide confinement for reasons of safety, security for the dog, housetraining, prevention of destructive behavior, and/or travel.

Why use a dog crate?
Correctly and humanely used, a crate can have many advantages for both you and your dog:

You...
Can enjoy peace of mind when leaving your dog home alone, knowing that nothing can be soiled or destroyed-and that she is comfortable, protected and not developing any bad habits.
Can housetrain your dog quickly by using the confinement to encourage control, establish a regular routine for outdoor elimination, and prevent accidents at night or when your dog is left alone.
Can effectively confine your dog at times when she may be under foot (i.e., when you have guests, at mealtimes), over-excited, or bothered by too much confusion or activity (such, as lots of children running around the house).
Can travel with your dog safely and be assured that she will more easily adapt to strange surroundings as long as she has her familiar "security blanket," her crate.
Your dog...
Can enjoy the privacy and security of a den of her own, to which she can retreat when tired, stressed or not feeling well.
Can avoid much of the fear, confusion and anxiety caused by your reaction to problem behavior.
Can more easily learn to control her bowels and to associate elimination only with the outdoors.
Can be spared the loneliness and frustration of having to be isolated, in the basement or outdoors, from indoor family surroundings when she needs to be restricted from certain things.
Can be more conveniently included in family outings and trips instead of being left behind alone.
Because dogs are highly social animals, it is important they are indoors much of the time, even when you are not home or are sleeping and can't interact with them. Your dog needs to feel that he is a part of the family, and that feeling of belonging comes from being included in family activities and living in the house even when her family may not be there.

A crate allows you to leave her in the house when you are away, or unable to supervise her. If she were to spend large amounts of time outside, she would very likely start to exhibit problem behaviors such as barking, digging, fence jumping and chewing. These problems can be avoided by keeping her inside and making her an integral part of the family."


PAWS - Crate Training - Benefits

Many dogs outgrow the need for a crate but the benefits to the dog last thoughout its life.
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Old 03-06-2013, 07:08 PM   #44
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With young small puppies I have always used a pen for them at first, with the crate for them to sleep in with the door open until they are old enough to hold it all night. Then I put them in a crate alongside the bed. They always get a treat when they go into the crate so they just run right in. Once they are housebroken, they have been loose at night with no problems but they are also gated off from the living room where there are a lot of things they could get into.

The only dog I have right now that was never crated was Susie. She slept on the bed with me till she was housebroken and too big, then she was just loose in the bedroom and kitchen. I was lucky and she never was a chewer and never did ruin anything.

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Old 05-27-2015, 03:19 PM   #45
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I don't have any dogs yet, but I am planning everything well ahead of time. I plan on adopting two small sized dogs. The house I am hoping to move into is a two story. All of the living area is downstairs and the bedrooms are all upstairs. So, crate in the living room where we will be during the day or upstairs where we sleep? Since they will be small dogs with smaller crates, can I just move the crates upstairs where we sleep or is a constant location part of the comfort? Would two crates for a single dog work in this situation?

I work all day (though I can come home at lunch and let them stretch their legs) so I plan on using crate training, especially when they are new. There is a small office on the bottom floor, so I am thinking about turning that into a doggy play room when I am at work, after they are established. I can put their crates in there at that time.

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Old 05-29-2015, 04:15 PM   #46
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Great questions! I've never crated trained 2 dogs at the same time, so I'm not so sure about putting two dogs in one crate. I think it's a great idea to have a doggy play room after they are established. Lucky dogs! I kept my crate in the living room during the day, and moved it into our bedroom at night. Of course, not always possible if you have large dogs. The crate becomes the dogs place for quiet time. When people came to visit, I put the crate in our bedroom, so if the dog wanted to get away from everyone for a while, it was his safe haven, so to speak.

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Old 06-01-2015, 02:36 PM   #47
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I plan on getting two small dogs, so size shouldn't be an issue. I read in another forum that crating dogs together can lead to problems. Especially if they are locked in. If they both choose to hang out in a open door crate, then its not a big deal. So, I am planning on two. I can put them right next to the two dogs and they can cuddle through the wire, as uncozy as that sounds. When I do adopt I'll find out how the dogs have been kept prior to me bringing them home as well. I'm assuming that the more familiar you can make their new home the better.. just like transitioning little kids

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Old 06-01-2015, 05:54 PM   #48
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I plan on getting two small dogs, so size shouldn't be an issue. I read in another forum that crating dogs together can lead to problems. Especially if they are locked in. If they both choose to hang out in a open door crate, then its not a big deal. So, I am planning on two. I can put them right next to the two dogs and they can cuddle through the wire, as uncozy as that sounds. When I do adopt I'll find out how the dogs have been kept prior to me bringing them home as well. I'm assuming that the more familiar you can make their new home the better.. just like transitioning little kids
I agree with the idea of using two crates as well. When I had two dogs, they each regarded their crate as "their own" space where they could go for some quiet time or a nap. I also had both crates next to each other which worked out fine. I think all the 'pre-adoption homework' you are doing is just fantastic!
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